From The Office Of Representative James D. Gailliard November Newsletter

November Newsletter

From the Office of

Representative James D. Gailliard

District 25

Volume 1, Issue 21

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

General Assembly – Committee Updates

There are no updates on Committees for the month of October.



To follow up on daily updates on General Assembly News, visit ncleg.gov where you can learn more about proposed bills or new committees developed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 Case Updates

Friends,

As of November 12th, 2020, we have 300,561 confirmed cases in North Carolina. There are 1,246 people hospitalized with COVID-19. Nash County has 3,829 cases and Edgecombe County has 2,199 cases. We have confirmed 4,698 deaths for

North Carolina, with 86 reported in Nash County and 66 reported in Edgecombe County

You can visit the DHHS Dashboard for updates:

https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/dashboard

Continue Prevention Measures to slow the spread of COVID-19:

NC Remains in Phase 3

Continuation of Phase 3 and Reduction of Indoor Mass Gathering Limit

Governor Roy Cooper announced this week that North Carolina’s indoor mass gathering limit will be lowered to 10 people in an effort to drive down North Carolina’s key COVID-19 metrics. Executive Order 176 will go into effect on Friday, November 13th and will be in place through Friday, December 4th.

As the weather gets colder, more people will be gathering indoors. Science has shown that indoor gatherings increase risk of transmission of COVID-19, and this Executive Order seeks to limit indoor gatherings that could rapidly and dangerously spread the virus.

The Order does not change the reduced capacity limits for certain businesses that have already been laid out. For more on this, read the Frequently Asked Questions document.

Governor Cooper and NC DHHS Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen also underscored the need for people to wear a mask anytime they gather with people outside of their immediate household. As the holiday season approaches, NCDHHS released health guidance to help people celebrate as safely as possible without spreading the virus.

Dr. Cohen also provided an update on North Carolina’s data and trends.

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is decreasing but still elevated.

Trajectory of Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

· ·North Carolina’s trajectory of cases is increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive is level but above 5 percent.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations is level but high.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread in testing, tracing and prevention.

Testing

· Testing capacity is high

Tracing Capability

· The state is continuing to hire contact tracers to bolster the efforts of local health departments.

· There have been almost 350,000 downloads of the exposure notification app, SlowCOVIDNC.

Personal Protective Equipment

· North Carolina’s personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Read Executive Order 176.

Read a Frequently Asked Questions document about the Order.

COVID-19: Additional Orders

Governor Cooper Signs Executive Order to Strengthen Eviction Prevention and Help Renters Stay in Their Homes

Governor Roy Cooper issued Executive Order No. 171 to strengthen eviction protections to help North Carolina renters stay in their homes. With COVID-19 case counts increasing and many people continuing to work and learn remotely, preventing evictions is critical to the state’s fight against this virus.

The economic toll of COVID-19 has left thousands of families struggling to make ends meet. According to a report from the National Council of State Housing Agencies, approximately 300,000 – 410,000 households across North Carolina are currently unable to pay rent.

Last month, the Center for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) put a temporary residential eviction moratorium into effect nationwide from September 4 through December 31, 2020. The CDC order protects residential tenants from eviction for nonpayment of rent. However, confusion over who this order protects has caused inconsistent enforcement and unwarranted evictions in some parts of the state.

Executive Order No. 171 requires landlords to make residential tenants aware of their rights under the CDC Order. For eviction actions commencing after Executive Order No. 171, landlords must give residents the option to fill out a declaration form before starting any eviction action.

The Order also sets forth procedures to ensure protection for residential tenants once they provide the required declaration form to the court or to the landlord.

Read a FAQ about Executive Order No. 171.

News

Gov. Roy Cooper signs executive order preventing N.C. evictions for those unable to pay rent, WBTV: https://www.wbtv.com/2020/10/28/gov-roy-cooper-signs-executive-order-preventing-nc-evictions-those-unable-pay-rent/

Cooper: NC Will Stay In Phase 3 For 3 More Weeks, WSOCTV, https://www.wsoctv.com/news/local/cooper-nc-will-stay-paused-phase-3-three-more-weeks/2LYEW5RJYFHXTPKKWS245ZQP6I/

Daily coronavirus cases, hospitalizations reach new highs in NC, WRAL: https://www.newsbreak.com/north-carolina/raleigh/news/2091347732559/daily-coronavirus-cases-hospitalizations-reach-new-highs-in-nc

COVID-19 vaccine to be limited at first. How many may be available in each NC county? Charlotte Observer, https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/coronavirus/article246753891.html

Get Your Flu Shot!

The first and most important step in protecting you and your family from the flu virus is to get a flu vaccine each year. Yet many North Carolinians don’t get vaccinated.

Contact your health care provider or visit https://vaccinefinder.org/ to find a convenient location to get a flu vaccination near you.

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

Nash County Black Folk You Better Vote Rep. James David Gailliard Need Your Vote

James David Gailliard

Here is a snapshot of Nash County by precinct. The purple are Rocky Mount precincts. Please call 5 family members/friends and encourage them to vote. If you need a ride to the poll call our church at 252-442-2925. Vote early. Don’t wait until Election Day.

Image may contain: text that says 'Precinct Nashville South Benvenue Winstead Edwards Downtown Hunter Hill Spring Hope Oak Level Battleboro Griffins Sunset Sharpsburg Whitakers Salem Castalia Dortches Red Oak Samaria Momeyer All Voters 6995 3610 4871 5813 2508 3123 2870 3046 4187 2378 1918 2791 3266 832 992 1450 1525 3066 1843 813 57897 Not Voted 32.9% 51.1% 45.7% 36.9% 54.5% 45.6% 41.0% 45.7% 36.0% 50.4% 41.3% 38.6% 40.6% 55.4% 54.1% 54.3% 39.6% 37.0% Not Voted 2301 1845 2224 2144 1368 1424 1178 1391 1509 1199 792 1078 1327 461 537 787 604 1135 1013 425 24742 55.0% 52.3% 42.7%'

Alert: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard – The Myth of Police Department Defunding

Alert: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

The Myth of Police Department Defunding

Friends,

It has come to my attention that the Speaker of the House, Tim Moore, released misinformation regarding Future Nows’ goals and pledge to defund police departments.

What you are hearing or reading is simply not true. I never signed a pledge to defund the police. I do not support defunding police departments. As a matter of fact, I have been endorsed by the state’s largest law enforcement organization – The North Carolina Police Benevolence Association.

For the many of you who are not aware, I have a 24 year old son who will graduate in October from Nash County Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET). Therefore, defunding the police is far from my intention. It breaks my heart that when partisan talking points are released most often, people don’t ask or fact check before jumping to conclusions, but again that’s what it’s designed to do – further divide us. 

My support of law enforcement has been unquestionable as has been my support to our community. For the record, I signed the “America’s Goals” pledge to commit to work towards shared goals for good jobs, affordable quality healthcare, investing in children, people over special interest, equal opportunity, and infrastructure investment. These goals have measurable outcomes such as better schools, higher life expectancy and equal pay. America’s Goals is about results to improve lives and does not include any rhetoric to defund the police. The America’s Goals pledge is not an endorsement of any policy position. Apparently, saving tax payer dollars and investing in proven strategies to make people safer and law enforcement more supported is not embraced by everyone.

I caution all of you to not be surprised by partisan tactics as this was prevalent in the 2018 elections. We should always fact check and not get distracted by partisan failures to acknowledge or endorse policies that support basic human needs such as healthcare for hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians and equal opportunities to live a healthy lifestyle.

I do hope we can all learn to work together to create an equitable community for everyone. That has certainly been what I have worked daily on since being sent to Raleigh by the residents of Nash County. I thank you all for your continued support and recommendations as we strive together to make Nash County, the city of Rocky Mount and Eastern North Carolina a better place to live!

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

Rep. James D. Gailliard Legislative Update September 2020

September Newsletter

From the Office of

Representative James D. Gailliard

District 25

Volume 1, Issue 19

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

General Assembly – Committee Updates

There are no Committee updates for the month of August.

COVID-19 Case Updates

Friends,

As of September 2nd, 2020, we have 169,424 confirmed cases in North Carolina. There are 100 counties with cases. There are 946 people hospitalized with COVID-19. Nash County has 1,703 cases and Edgecombe County has 968 cases. We have confirmed 2,741 deaths for

North Carolina, with 24 reported in Nash County and 20 reported in Edgecombe County

You can visit the DHHS Dashboard for updates:

https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/dashboard

Continue Prevention Measures to slow the spread of COVID-19:

COVID-19 – Recovered Statistics

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services released the, “COVID-19 Patients Presumed to be Recovered,” report on August 31st. This number is calculated to be 145,884.

It’s important to note that this calculation is a rough estimate with several limitations to keep in mind:

· Patients’ actual recovery times could be shorter or longer depending on the severity of illness.

· These estimates cannot account for other factors that could impact a patient’s recovery time or disease severity, such as age and underlying health conditions.

· These estimates do not measure the amount of natural immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the population.

· There also appears to potentially be long-term negative health impacts for some people from having contracted COVID-19, which also isn’t accounted for in this number.

That full report it available below:

https://files.nc.gov/covid/documents/dashboard/Weekly-COVID19-Patients-Presumed-to-be-Recovered.pdf

COVID-19

North Carolina Moves to Phase 2.5

Yesterday, Governor Cooper announced that Safer at Home Phase 2.5 will begin this upcoming Friday (9/4) at 5:00pm and remains in effect through October 2. Mask mandates and other prevention methods remain in effect and are even more important to contain the virus.

Phase 2.5 means the following for North Carolina:



· Mass gathering limits will increase to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors from the current limit of 10 indoors and 25 outdoors.

· Playgrounds may open.

· Museums and aquariums may open at 50% capacity.

· Gyms and indoor exercise facilities, such as yoga studios, martial arts, and rock climbing, as well as skating rinks, bowling alleys, indoor basketball, volleyball etc., may open at 30% capacity.

· Bars, nightclubs, movie theaters, indoor entertainment facilities, amusement parks, dance halls will remain closed.

· Large venues remain subject to the mass gathering limits.

In addition, NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen issued a Secretarial Order allowing for outdoor visitation at nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities. To participate, nursing homes must meet several requirements, including, but not limited, not having a current outbreak, having a testing plan and updated written Infection Control or Preparedness plan for COVID-19, and having adequate personal protective equipment. The Secretarial Order is also effective this Friday at 5 PM and remains in effect through September 22, 2020.

Read the Executive Order.

Read the Secretarial Order.

Read the Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 News

Governor Cooper Proposes Budget to Continue Fighting COVID-19

Governor Roy Cooper this week shared a recommended budget for Fiscal Year 2020-2021. North Carolina has yet to pass a State Budget for 2020-2021 because the COVID-19 crisis pushed back tax filing deadlines from April 15 to July 15, making it more difficult to estimate revenues for this fiscal year.

Even with this uncertainty, it is important to pass a budget that uses remaining coronavirus federal funding and make responsible investments in the state’s future with the revenues we know we have.

North Carolina has more than $900 million left in federal Coronavirus Relief Funds from the federal CARES Act. Here is Governor Cooper’s plan to spend these funds:

· $175 million for critical public health services including:

· $25 million for testing and tracing;

· $50 million to target rural and historically marginalized populations; and

· $40 million for early childhood services;

· $49 million to build a state strategic stockpile of personal protective equipment (PPE);

· $132 million to help K-12 public schools to protect students, teachers and staff and ensure students most impacted by COVID-19 receive support;

· $200 million in aid for local governments facing budget shortfalls;

· $50 million to establish an emergency grant program to expand high-speed internet access;

· $27.5 million to combine with other funds to create a $50 million relief program to support NC businesses with rent, mortgage and utility relief;

· $18 million to combine with other funds to create a $33 million grant program for Historically Underutilized Businesses (HUB) that have been left out of other support programs;

· $25 million to provide equipment for health care and first responder workforce programs at community colleges to continue the state’s pipeline of necessary, qualified workers;

· $25 million to research obstacles to reliable, rapid COVID-19 testing;

· $50 million in direct aid to food banks, emergency feeding organizations, and community organizations for food and nutrition assistance.

The Governor’s budget also proposes a responsible investment of North Carolina’s state dollars to ensure the state has a stable foundation to succeed in the long-term and emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic stronger.

· A one-time $2,000 bonus to K-12 public school teachers, instructional support personnel, principals and assistant principals.

· A one-time $1,000 bonus to K-12 non-certified public school personnel.

· A one-time $1,500 bonus to UNC System and NC Community College System personnel.

· $50 million to support the highest needs students, schools, and districts and early childhood education as a part of the state’s commitment to providing a sound basic education to all students.

· $86.5 million to provide state matching funds for FEMA Recovery programs from Hurricanes Matthew, Florence, Dorian and Isaias, and to assist with recovery in Alleghany County after the August 9 earthquake.

The Governor’s proposal is just a first step, but it is a good with. Next legislators will work on their proposal. Whatever the legislature passes will end up going back to Governor Cooper for his approval or veto.

Supporting North Carolinians Out of Work

Governor Cooper’s budget also proposes a responsible expansion of the state’s unemployment benefits program. Currently, North Carolina has the worst benefits in the country for unemployed workers.

Cooper’s proposal would increase the duration of available benefits from 12 weeks to 24 weeks and increase the maximum weekly benefit to $500. Any formula-driven unemployment insurance tax increases would be suspended through 2022. This proposal would keep the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund Balance above $2 billion. There is currently $3.05 billion in the fund.

Closing the Health Care Coverage Gap

Governor Cooper’s budget also recommends expanding Medicaid to cover 600,000 more North Carolinians who are currently in a health care coverage gap. Expansion is 90% funded by the federal government with the remaining cost paid by health care providers and insurance companies, leaving the state with no additional cost.

This will save lives, most importantly, but it will also bring billions of dollars back to North Carolina in federal funding to create health care jobs and expand our health care infrastructure.

Investing in Critical Infrastructure

Through the use of bonds, North Carolina can take advantage of historically low interest rates to improve the state’s health care infrastructure and response to COVID-19 as well as make other critical investments in schools, water and sewer systems and affordable housing.

The Governor proposes a $988 million health care infrastructure limited obligation bond to support health facilities, public health labs, and vaccine development. In addition, his budget recommends placing a $4.3 billion infrastructure general obligation bond on the November 2021 ballot that would invest:

· $2 billion in school construction;

· $800 million for water and sewer infrastructure;

· $500 million for UNC System facilities;

· $500 million for the Community College system; and

· $500 million for affordable housing.

Each $1 million in investment sustains or creates up to 13 direct jobs and 28 indirect jobs, helping support the economy as it recovers.

$175 million in COVID-19 relief for rent, utility help available for NC, governor says, The News & Observer, https://www.newsobserver.com/news/coronavirus/article245237590.html

Other News

Search for Unclaimed Property

Take a moment to see if the State of North Carolina has any unclaimed property that belongs to you. State law requires financial institutions, insurance companies, public agencies, and businesses to turn over unclaimed property to the state if there has been no contact with the owners for the statutory period of time.

From July 2019 through June 2020 the State has returned $39,759,941 in unclaimed property to people like you.

To search for property, go here: https://unclaimed.nccash.com/app/claim-search

To submit a claim, go here: https://unclaimed.nccash.com/app/claim-doc-upload

Missouri Becomes 38th State to Expand Medicaid

Missouri voters approved Medicaid Expansion in a referendum on Tuesday. North Carolina is now one of only twelve states to refuse to accept federal funding to expand health care coverage to 500,000 North Carolinians and to create health care-related jobs in our state.

The very first bill I sponsored in 2019 was Medicaid Expansion and the very first bill I sponsored in 2020 was Medicaid Expansion. While our current legislative leaders refuse to schedule a vote on the bill, I will continue to fight to improve health care and create health care jobs.

Missouri Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion Despite Resistance From Republican Leaders, WUNC, https://www.kunc.org/npr-news/2020-08-05/missouri-voters-approve-medicaid-expansion-despite-resistance-from-republican-leaders

Price Gouging and Disaster-Related Scams

The price-gouging law that protects people from disaster-related scammers is in effect in North Carolina.

You can report potential price gouging or scams by calling 1-877-5-NO-SCAM or by filing a complaint at https://ncdoj.gov/file-a-complaint/price-gouging/

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

Rep. James D. Gailliard Legislative Update #11 August 2020

Alert#11: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

COVID-19 Updates

Friends,

As of August 20th, 2020, we have 149,904 cases in North Carolina. All 100 counties have cases. There are 1,023 people in NC hospitalized with COVID-19. Nash County has 1,391 cases and Edgecombe County has 792 cases. We have confirmed 2,465 deaths for

North Carolina, with 17 reported in Nash County and 16 reported in Edgecombe County

You can visit the DHHS Dashboard for updates:

https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/dashboard

FOOD ASSISTANCE

Find meals for kids in your area:

Text: FOODNC to 877-877

For more information, visit: http://nokidhungrync.org

COVID-19 Case Count and Correction to LabCorp Data

Data Correction: The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) today announced corrections to the State’s daily and cumulative completed COVID-19 test counts after discovering a discrepancy between electronic and manual reporting of testing data that had been submitted by LabCorp. The LabCorp data error resulted in a higher count of total COVID-19 tests performed. The reporting error does NOT affect the key COVID-19 Dashboard trends North Carolina uses to monitor this pandemic, including the number of new positive cases and percent of tests that are positive. This error did not impact reporting of results to patients or doctors. “Although this reporting error impacts our count of total tests completed, it does not alter our key metrics or change our understanding of COVID-19 transmission in North Carolina, which shows stabilization over the last few weeks,” said Secretary Mandy Cohen. Click To Read More

Governor Cooper Directs $95.6 Million to Support Students Impacted by the COVID-19 Pandemic

Governor Roy Cooper directed $95.6 million in new funding to help support K-12 and postsecondary students most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic who can benefit from support during the upcoming school year. The funding is North Carolina’s share of the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Fund, a part of the federal CARES Act. The GEER funds are intended to provide emergency support to school districts, postsecondary institutions, or other education-related entities for addressing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. “Learning during a pandemic is an unprecedented challenge for students and staff, whether in the classroom or remotely. This funding should help protect the physical and mental health at schools, and help bridge the gap for students with unique learning needs,” Governor Cooper said. Click to Read More

Census 2020

Make NC Count!

The 2020 Census response deadline is now September 30th. Door-to-door counting for nonresponding households began on August 11, 2020. Response rates will continue to improve, but the risk of undercounting the population is higher for areas with higher nonresponse rates. Historically, self-response provides more accurate individual data than door-to-door counting. As of August 11, over 4 million North Carolinians need to be counted putting at risk an estimated $7.4 billion annually for the next 10 years.

Quickly completing your census form either online (my2020census.gov), by phone (844-330-2020), or by paper questionnaire decreases the need for a Census worker to visit your home and maintains social distancing.

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

Rep. James D. Gailliard State Water Infrastructure

Alert: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

State Water Infrastructure

While we are busy navigating the challenges of public health, businesses and school re-openings and legislating for equity in criminal justice, we are also continuing to invest in our rural infrastructure.

Water infrastructure is critical in Eastern North Carolina to make sure our water is clean, our natural resources are protected, and our businesses can grow. We need more of this type of investment. That is why I support state bond proposals to allow the voters to take advantage of low interest rates to approve new investments in public school buildings, transportation projects, and clean water infrastructure.

Although I am not elected by all of these regions (below), I do champion regional infrastructure development and want to share these recently announced projects in our region funded by the State Water Infrastructure Authority.

Below, are the Cities, Types of Projects Approved on July 8, 2020 and Total Funding Amount

· Enfield: Water Improvement, $859,685

· Whitakers: Water Line Replacement, $750,000

· Elm City: Sewer System Rehab, $1,996,726

· Bailey: Sewer System Rehab, $533,900

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

 

Rep. James Gailliard, District 25 | 536 Legislative Office Building, Raleigh, NC 27601

 

 

Rep. James D. Gailliard School Plans for 2020-2021 Academic year

Alert#10: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

School Plans for 2020-2021 Academic year

Governor Cooper announced Plan B for school reopening with the option to operate under Plan C. In addition to the announcement about school plans, Governor Cooper shared that North Carolina will remain paused in Safer At Home Phase 2 after the current Executive Order expires on Friday, July 17.

The Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit outlines the updated requirements for Plan B. Districts may choose to operate under Plan C, which calls for remote learning only, and health leaders recommend schools allow families to opt in to all-remote learning. Modifications have been made to Plan B since it was released in June to make it more protective of public health.

Under Plan B, schools are required to follow key safety measures that include:

· Require face coverings for all teachers and students K-12

· Limit the total number of students, staff and visitors within a school building to the extent necessary to ensure 6 feet distance can be maintained when students/staff will be stationary

· Conduct symptom screening, including temperature checks

· Establish a process and dedicated space for people who are ill to isolate and have transportation plans for ill students

· Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in the school and transportation vehicles regularly

· Require frequent hand washing throughout the school day and provide hand sanitizer at entrances and in every classroom

· Discontinue activities that bring together large groups

· Limit nonessential visitors and activities involving external groups

· Discontinue use of self-service food or beverage distribution

In addition, schools are strongly recommended to follow additional safety measures that include:

· Designate hallways and entrance/exit doors as one-way

· Keep students and teachers in small groups that stay together as much as possible

· Have meals delivered to the classroom or have students bring food back to the classroom if social distancing is not possible in the cafeteria

· Discontinue activities that bring together large groups

· Place physical barriers such as plexiglass at reception desks and similar areas

If you want to follow data on the aforementioned metrics on COVID-19,

NC DHHS maintains this information on their website:

https://www.ncdhhs.gov/covid-19-case-count-nc

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

#Theydonotwanttohearthemtrues
#USAbuiltonbacksofblacks
#Fearoftheshiftabsodamnlutely
#Somethingswrong
#Timeforwaitingisover
#Sickandtiredofbeingsickandtired
#Blacklivesmatter #Iwatchedvideo
#Whereisthethreat
#Icantbreathe8minutes46seconds
#Policebrutalitymurdertheytired
#1898WilmingtonRaceRiot
#1921TulsaBlackWallStreet
#Confederatemonumentstograveyard
#Undercoverracist
#Tiredofsafenegroblackfolk
#Blackcrimeprotestforwhat
#Unstablepresident
#Iamnotok #Ibeenengagedbeforenow
#Coronavirusstayfocused #Stayhome

Curmilus Butch Dancy II 2020

Rep. James D. Gailliard Legislative Update July 15, 2020

July Newsletter

From the Office of

Representative James D. Gailliard

District 25

Volume 1, Issue 17

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

COVID-19 Updates

Friends,

As of July 15th, 2020, we have 91,266 cases in North Carolina. There are 100 counties with cases. There are 1,142 people hospitalized with COVID-19. Nash County has 666 cases and Edgecombe County has 409 cases. We have confirmed 1,568 deaths for

North Carolina, with 6 reported in Nash County and 9 reported in Edgecombe County

You can visit the DHHS Dashboard for updates:

https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/dashboard

Continue Prevention Measures to slow the spread of COVID-19:

General Assembly – Committee Updates

Appropriations Committee – the following bills was discussed:

HB 1136 (PCS)   Funds for NCSSM – Morganton Campus 2020-2021

HB 1087 (PCS)   Waste Water Public Enterprise Reform

HB 1071 (PCS)   Funds to DPI for ADM Growth

HB 1218 (PCS)   Salary Related Contribution/Debt Service Funds – SB 809

HB  472 (PCS)   NCSU Match and NC A&T Match

HB 1229 (PCS)   UI Program Integrity/Temp. ABAWD Time Waivers

HB 1189 (PCS)   Driver Education COVID-19 Response

SB 801 Military Presence Stabilization Fund/Funding.

SB 806 Capital Appropriation – Western Carolina Univ.

SB 836 State Operations/Increase Federal Funds Use.

HB 1096 UNC Omnibus Changes/UNC Funds.

SB 811 Connect NC Park Facilities Operating Reserves.

SB 812 Agricultural Sciences Center Funds.

SB 814 NC Promise Tuition Plan Funds.

SB 816 Funds for CC Enrollment Growth/FY 2020-2021.

HB 1164 Fund Pitt Mental Health Ct./Pretrial Program.

HB 1200 Foreclosure Prev.Grants/Rental & Utility Asst.

SB 750 Capital Projects-Elizabeth City State Univ.

HB 1070 Emergency Grants for Certain Milk Producers.

HB 1105 COVID/Supplementary G.R.E.A.T. Grant Period.

HB 1201 Local Meat Processors Grants/Marketing Funds.

HB 1205 Expedited State Leasing-Broadband.

HB 1225 Education & Transportation Bond Act of 2020.

SB 284 State Auditor/Verifications & Access.

SB 805 Coronavirus Relief Funds/Create Offsets.

SB 808 Medicaid Funding Act.

SB 813 UNC Building Reserve/Certain Project/FY 20-21.

SB 817 Funds for UNC Enrollment Growth/FY 2020-2021.

Education K12 – discussed the following bills:

HB 1050, PED/Low-Performing School Districts

HB 1189 Drivers Education COVID-19 Response

HB 1199 Graduating Sr Numeric Grade/Appropriate Funds HB 1035 Education Omnibus/COVID-19

Health Committee – Secretary Mandy Cohen discussed updates on the COVID-19 pandemic

SB 168 Expand Allowed Medical Uses/Cannabis Extract.

There are no additional updates on the other Committees for the month of June.



To follow up on daily updates on General Assembly News, visit ncleg.gov where you can learn more about proposed bills at session or new committees developed as a result of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Testing Sites

NCDHHS to Deploy Up to 300 Free Testing Sites in Underserved Communities

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services launched the Community testing in High-priority And Marginalized Populations (CHAMP) Initiative to increase access to no-cost COVID-19 testing for African American, LatinX/Hispanic and American Indian communities that currently have limited testing sites.

A disproportionately high percentage of North Carolina’s confirmed cases of COVID-19 have occurred among historically marginalized populations. Mounting evidence shows the members of these populations experience higher rates of COVID-19 mortality and serious complications.

“Increasing access to free testing is key to our ability to respond to and contain COVID-19,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D. “This targeted testing initiative seeks to confront historical health disparities by increasing COVID-19 testing capacity in underserved communities across the state.”

As many as 300 temporary testing sites will be deployed throughout the month of July, including drive-thru and walk-up sites. Find your testing location here:

https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/about-covid-19/testing/find-my-testing-place

COVID-19 News

House Democrats Stand Strong to Stop Re-Opening Bars

The General Assembly passed HB 536 to re-open bars in North Carolina even while hospitalizations in our state hit a record-high. Governor Cooper vetoed it.

The House Republican leadership scheduled the veto override vote. While much of our legislative work and votes can be done using remote means, the wording in our state constitution requires veto votes to be in person. So lawmakers in both parties who had been using remote technology had to come vote in person.



When it became apparent that the Democrats had all shown up and the Republican leadership would lose the veto vote, they cancelled the vote. So the bill to re-open bars remains blocked.

Democrats Propose Small Business Relief Grants to Businesses Closed Due to COVID-19

House Democrats proposed a $50 million grant program to help small businesses like gyms forced to close due to COVID-19. Priority for the grants would be given to businesses with less than 100 employees and those who are not receiving federal small business assistance.

Republican leaders blocked consideration of the amendment, instead, putting in their own, similar amendment in a bill that is currently sitting in a legislative graveyard.

All of our businesses will continue to suffer until the public health situation improves and consumers grow confident enough to resume normal spending. Until then, we should stop partisan political games and provide our closed businesses with funding to help them survive.

COVID-19 federal aid has kept NC’s rural hospitals afloat, for now.

North Carolina Health News, https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/finance/covid-19-federal-aid-has-kept-ncs-rural-hospitals-afloat-now

Black deaths due to COVID-19 reveal health, economic disparities

NC Policy Watch, http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2020/06/25/blacks-deaths-due-to-covid-19-reveal-health-economic-disparities/

How COVID-19 moves from crowded restaurants to long-term care

Carolina Public Press, https://carolinapublicpress.org/30659/how-covid-19-moves-from-crowded-restaurants-to-long-term-care/



UNC coronavirus study shows why it’s important to wear a mask that covers your nose, The News & Observer, https://www.havasunews.com/nation/coronavirus-study-shows-why-it-s-important-to-wear-a-mask-that-covers-your-nose/article_20eca408-b185-11ea-a9a7-eb279eb4a2d0.html

Other News

Unemployment

Legislators, Advocates Push for Needed Changes to NC’s Unemployment System

Long before the COVID-19 crisis, North Carolina had the worst unemployment system in the country for unemployed workers. Our system provided too little in compensation, for too short a period of time, to too few unemployed workers.

I am a strong supporter of House Bill 1075 to fix the unemployment system now so jobless workers can weather the current crisis and the next one. Federal pandemic assistance programs are set to expire at the end of July and December, leaving workers and businesses across our state with an inadequate system to stabilize the state’s economy through to a full recovery, particularly given the potential for a second wave of the virus in the fall.

House Bill 1075 would:

· Lengthen the amount of time an unemployed worker could potentially receive compensation to 26 weeks (up from 13);

· Increase the maximum potential weekly benefit to $450/week (up from a max of $350/week); and

· Expand when a worker could receive unemployment such as when a spouse relocates for a job.

Democratic lawmakers: NC unemployment insurance system ‘underfunded’ and ‘unprepared’, WRAL, https://www.wral.com/democratic-lawmakers-nc-unemployment-insurance-system-underfunded-and-unprepared/19166510/

Education

Bill Advances to Pay Teachers $350 Bonuses and Step Pay Increases

SB 818 passed the General Assembly and was signed by the Governor on June 26th. The bill’s title describes what it does pretty well: “An Act to Provide for the Compensation of Certain Public School Employees.”  Some public school employees receive money in the bill and some do not.

All teachers receive a $350 one-time bonus. Some (not all) teachers receive a “step increase” in pay as they move up a year in the established salary schedule. What happens to non-teachers who work in our schools, such as custodians, bus drivers, or teaching assistants? They receive nothing.

Democrats offered two amendments to provide larger bonuses to teachers and to include all public school employees in the bonuses, but the House Republican leadership blocked these amendments and so they failed. I strongly supported both amendments.

I voted No on the bill because the bonuses were too small and are much less than the scheduled pay raises for state employees who work outside of our public schools. We need to do better. If we continue to insult teachers and other public school workers, we will not be able to attract and retain good teachers and workers for our schools.

Every Child’s Right to a Sound, Basic Education

North Carolina’s courts and state constitution guarantee that every child has a right to a sound, basic education. Today, the truth is we are failing too many of our children particularly those who are African-American, Hispanic, and Native American.

Lack of state funding is a big part of the problem. After ten years of Republican state budgets, North Carolina is now in the lowest tier of state spending per-pupil. Our courts have ordered us to act.

What can we do? House Democrats have introduced two bills that adopt common-sense, proven approaches to make sure every child has the opportunity to succeed.

HB 1129 reforms under performing schools, allows teacher salary increases based on experience and performance, increases the racial and ethnic diversity of teachers in schools, and rebuilds the state’s capacity to provide turnaround assistance in the state’s chronically low-performing schools by providing funding and funding flexibility.

HB 1130 makes the investments necessary to rebuild the teacher pipeline, train and keep the best teachers in North Carolina, and expand Pre-K, infant-toddler and Smart Start programs that benefit our children early in their development.

The events of the last few months – from COVID-19 to the killing of George Floyd – have laid bare the disparities in our education system. How do we begin to fix these disparities? For our schools and for our students, HB 1129 and HB 1130 are a good place to start.

26 Years After Leandro, These Lawmakers Say This is How to Fix Educational Inequality in NC, Cardinal and Pine, https://cardinalpine.com/story/26-years-after-leandro-these-lawmakers-say-this-is-how-to-fix-educational-inequality-in-nc/

Leandro action plan for next year: How will the state ensure a sound basic education for all?, EdNC, https://www.ednc.org/new-leandro-coalition-every-child-receives-quality-public-education/

Don’t Forget Census 2020

The 2020 Census is still underway, and it’s not too late to get counted! There are three ways to complete the census: online, by phone, or by mail. See details below.

Online: my2020census.gov

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

 

Rep. James Gailliard, District 25 | 536 Legislative Office Building, Raleigh, NC 27601

 
 

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Curmilus Butch Dancy II 2020

COVID19 Update #8: Phase 2, NC Re-opens on May 22nd Rep. James D. Gailliard

Alert#8: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

COVID-19 Cases in NC

As of today, May 21st, 2020, NC DHHS confirmed 20,910 cases in North Carolina. All 100 counties have cases. There are 578 people hospitalized with COVID-19. We have 716 confirmed deaths for North Carolina.

Nash County has 160 cases and 3 deaths; Edgecombe county has 174 cases and 9 deaths.

How Do We Evaluate NC’s stability for

Phase 2-Re-opening?

Governor Cooper announced we will move into Phase 2 of easing restrictions on Friday, May 22 at 5 pm. After two weeks in Phase 1, the state’s overall key indicators remain stable but the continued increases in daily case counts signal a need to take a more modest step forward in Phase 2 than originally envisioned.

Based on the metrics presented in April by Governor Cooper and Secretary Mandy Cohen, North Carolina is evaluating a combination of the data from the following categories that shows the state is stable, but still has increasing daily new lab confirmed case counts.

Key Metrics to evaluate North Carolina’s stability to re-open

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is decreasing.

Trajectory of Lab-Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s trajectory of lab-confirmed cases is increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive has been decreasing and is starting to level.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days

· North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations is level.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to be able to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread. These areas include:

Laboratory Testing

· North Carolina has more than doubled the daily testing rate with more than 8,000 tests completed daily on average. More than 300 testing sites across North Carolina are posted on the DHHS testing information website.

Tracing Capability

· The Carolina Community Tracing Collaborative has already hired more than 150 new contact tracers adding to the 250 already working at our local health departments.

Personal Protective Equipment

· Supply chains continue to improve.

If you want to follow data on the aforementioned metrics on COVID-19,

NC DHHS maintains this information on their website:

https://www.ncdhhs.gov/covid-19-case-count-nc

Legislative Update: Executive Order 141

Phase 2, Safer at Home

What is included in Safer At Home Phase 2?

Executive Order 141, Phase 2 lifts the Stay At Home order moving into a Safer At Home recommendation, especially for people at high risk for serious illness. Teleworking is also urged when possible.

Mass gathering limits in Phase 2 will be no more than 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors in most circumstances. These limits apply to the following: event venues; conference centers; stadiums and sports arenas; amphitheaters; and groups at parks or beaches.

Some businesses will remain closed in Phase 2 including: bars; night clubs; gyms and indoor fitness facilities; indoor entertainment venues such as movie theaters, and bowling alleys.

Certain businesses will be open at limited capacity with other requirements and recommendations including: restaurants at 50% dine-in capacity with distancing and cleaning requirements; personal care businesses, including salons and barbers, at 50% capacity with distancing and cleaning requirements; pools at 50% capacity with distancing and cleaning requirements. Employees of personal care businesses will be required to wear face coverings.

Childcare facilities, day camps and overnight camps will be open with enhanced cleaning and screening requirements. Retail businesses allowed to open in Phase 1 at 50% capacity will continue at that level.

Public health recommendations are provided for worship services to practice enhanced social distancing and other cleaning and hygiene practices.

The Safer At Home Phase 2 runs through at least Friday, June 26

Executive Order 141 for Phase 2 and FAQs provides guidance for the following entities

· Restaurants

· Places of Worship and Religious Services

· Large Venue Settings

· Retail Business

· Salons, Massage and Personal Care

· Pools and Spas

· Tattoo Parlors

· Day Camps

· Overnight Camps

· Child Care

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

Update #6: Coronavirus and Unemployment

Alert#6: From the Office of Representative James D. Gailliard

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

COVID-19 Update

As of today, May 14th, 2020, NC DHHS confirmed 16,507 cases in North Carolina. There are 99 counties with cases. There are 507 people hospitalized with COVID-19. We have 615 confirmed deaths for North Carolina.

Nash County has 140 cases and 3 deaths; Edgecombe county has 161 cases and 7 deaths.



If you want to follow the data on COVID-19 more often, NC DHHS maintains this information on their website:

https://www.ncdhhs.gov/covid-19-case-count-nc

Returning to Work and Unemployment Benefits

These FAQs provides information from the North Carolina Department of Commerce Division of Employment Security regarding how returning to work or refusing to return to work may impact unemployment benefits. It includes reasons related to COVID-19 for which an employee may have good cause to refuse to return to work when called back by their employer, as well as frequently asked questions for individuals and employers.

Returning to Work and Good Cause

As North Carolina enters Phase 1 of Governor Roy Cooper’s plan to ease COVID-19 restrictions, more businesses will be reopening, and more people will be returning to work. The Department of Commerce Division of Employment Security (DES) is providing the following information for individuals and employers about how returning to work may impact unemployment benefits. Refusing to return to work when your employer calls you back typically makes you ineligible to receive unemployment benefits. When you return to work, you should stop filing your Weekly Certifications for unemployment. DES will consider that you have good cause to refuse to return to work, and may continue to be eligible for unemployment benefits, if you refuse due to one of these COVID-19 related reasons:

1. You have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and have been advised by a medical professional to not attend work.

2. A member of your household has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or you are providing care for a family member or a member of your household who has been diagnosed with COVID-19.

3. You are at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines a high-risk individual as a person 65 years of age or older, or a person of any age, who has serious underlying medical conditions including being immunocompromised, or has chronic lung disease, moderate-to-severe asthma, serious heart conditions, severe obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and undergoing dialysis, or liver disease.

4. You are the primary caregiver of a child or person in your household who is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency, and the school or facility is required for you to work.

5. You are unable to reach your place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency or you have been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19.

6. In order to comply with any governmental order regarding travel, business operations and mass gatherings, you must refuse a recall to your former employment or an offer of suitable work.

7.You reasonably believe there is a valid degree of risk to your health and safety due to a significant risk of exposure or infection to COVID-19 at your employer’s place of business due to a failure of the employer to comply with guidelines as set out by the CDC, other governmental authorities or industry groups as may be found in CDC guidance, the Governor’s Executive Orders, or other binding authority; or due to objective reasons that the employer’s facility is not safe for the claimant to return to work.

Frequently Asked Questions: Unemployment

I have been getting unemployment benefits, but I am returning to work. What should I do? If you return to work, stop filing your Weekly Certifications to discontinue your benefits. You do not need to report to DES that you’ve gone back to work. If you continue to receive benefits for weeks after you return to work, you may be required to pay back the benefits you were overpaid.

What should I do if I’m returning to work, but I’ll be working reduced hours?

Continue to file your Weekly Certifications and report any wages you earn. Remember, you must report wages for the week in which you earned them, not the week in which you are paid. Any wages you earn may affect your weekly benefit amount. My employer has called me back to work.

What happens if I choose not to return?

Generally, an employee is disqualified from receiving further benefits if the employee chooses not to return to work after receiving notice to do so from their employer. If your employer has called you back and you did not return to work, you should report that you have refused an offer to work when filing your Weekly Certification. You will have an opportunity to provide more information about your reason for not returning to work. You may continue to be eligible for benefits if you do not return to work for good cause. Examples of good cause related to COVID-19 are set out in the above section, including being diagnosed with COVID-19, caring for someone with COVID-19 or being unable to get to work because of travel restrictions due to COVID-19. DES will determine eligibility for unemployment benefits on a case-by-case basis

I feel unsafe returning to work because I am 65 or older and/or have a medical condition that makes me at higher risk for severe illness if I contract COVID-19. Can I refuse to return to work?

If you are 65 or older and/or you have a medical condition that puts you at a high risk for severe illness if you are infected with COVID-19, and your employer is not able to offer you a safe workplace or your job does not allow for a reasonable accommodation such as teleworking, you may have good cause for not returning to work and be eligible to receive benefits. A note from a Doctor of Medicine or Osteopathy who is authorized to practice medicine by the state will be considered as proof of a high-risk medical condition.

I would like to return to work and I am not 65 or older or a high-risk individual for severe illness if I contract COVID-19. However, I have reasonable concerns that my work environment is unsafe. Can I choose not to return to work and remain eligible for benefits?

You should talk to your employer. If your employer has taken steps to create a safer workplace by following safety standards as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) or other governmental authorities or industry groups, you may be found ineligible for benefits if you choose not to return to work. If your employer is not following recommended safety standards, then your refusal to return to work may make you eligible for benefits.

I can make more money collecting unemployment benefits than I can returning to work. Can I refuse an offer to return to work because I will earn less and remain eligible for benefits?

No. Choosing not to return to work solely on the basis that you will earn less than you can collect in unemployment benefits is not considered good cause when your employer has offered you your former employment back or other suitable employment. If you refuse to return to work solely on this basis you will not be eligible to receive benefits.

What if I disagree with the decision that is made about my benefits?

You and your employer will be notified about the determination of your eligibility. The employee and employer both have the right to appeal the determination if they disagree with the decision.

My employees are returning to work. What do I need to do with regard to unemployment claims?

You do not need to report to DES that your employees are returning to work. However, please notify your employees who have been receiving unemployment assistance that they should stop filing their Weekly Certifications for benefits. If employees continue to receive benefits for weeks after they return to work, they may be required to repay the benefits they were overpaid.

What if I have an employee who has refused to return or quit when I called them back to work?

Employers may report to DES that employees have not returned to work when work is available. Sign into your online account at des.nc.gov and click on the form that will be available soon on your ‘Employer Homepage’ to submit information about an employee’s refusal to return to work. We will review the information to help determine the employee’s’ eligibility for unemployment benefits.

I have an employee who does not want to return to work because they feel unsafe. Can they quit and receive unemployment benefits?

Eligibility for unemployment benefits is determined on a case-by-case basis. Typically, an employee who quits without good cause is not eligible for benefits. An employee may have good cause to refuse to work, and may be eligible to receive benefits, if there is a valid risk to their health and safety due to a significant risk of COVID-19 exposure or infection at the place of business. It is recommended that employers comply with guidance from the CDC and/or other authorities to help provide a safer workplace as their employees return to work. I have made some changes in the way we do business due to the current environment.

Can an employee refuse to return to work due to the changes and get benefits?

An employee may be eligible to receive unemployment benefits if there is a substantial change in the contract of hire and they quit their position. For example, if you reduce their pay by 25 to 30%, permanently change their assigned shift without their agreement, move them to a new facility with a substantially longer commute, or make other drastic modifications to the type of work for which you hired them would constitute a substantial change in the contract of hire. However, minor changes, for example moving them to a new line, requiring one or two extra hours of work a day, or changing their work location in the same facility, etc., likely would not constitute a change in the contract of hire, and they would not be eligible for unemployment benefits. The issue of what is substantial is very fact specific and is determined on a case-by-case basis.

What if I disagree with the decision made about an employee’s eligibility for benefits? The employer and employee will be notified about the determination of eligibility for benefits. Both have the right to appeal the determination if they disagree with the decision.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance: NC Division of Employment Security

Do you need to follow-up on a pending application? Visit the following link: https://des.nc.gov/customer-contact-form.

If you are having issues with your online account, (log-in errors and PIN issues),  you should e-mail:  NCDESpasswordhelp@nccommerce.com

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

May Newsletter From The Office Of Representative James D. Gailliard District 25

 

May Newsletter

 

From the Office of

Representative James D. Gailliard

District 25

 

 

Volume 1, Issue 15

 

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

 

·    HEALTH

·    APPROPRIATIONS

·    APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

·    EDUCATION K-12

·    HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

 

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

 

COVID-19 Updates

 

Friends,

As of May 8th, 2020, we have 13,838 cases in North Carolina. There are 99 counties with cases. Nash County has 116 cases and Edgecombe County has 139 cases. There are 515 people hospitalized with COVID-19. We have confirmed 527 deaths for

North Carolina, with 3 reported in Nash County and 7 reported in Edgecombe County

 

Executive Order 138

Effective Friday, May 8th at 5pm

 

Phase 1 of 3:

Governor Cooper announced a modified stay at home order and transition to Phase 1 of easing restrictions. Governor Roy Cooper signed Executive Order No. 138 to modify North Carolina’s Stay At Home order and transition to Phase 1 of slowly easing certain COVID-19 restrictions. Certain businesses will remain closed. The Order removes the distinction between essential and non-essential businesses. Retail businesses are allowed to open at 50% capacity and will be required to direct customers to stand 6 feet apart, perform frequent cleanings, provide hand sanitizer when available, screen workers for symptoms, and more. The Order allows people to leave their homes for commercial activity at any business that is open. Certain businesses remain closed, including bars, personal care businesses, entertainment venues, and gyms. Restaurants may only continue to serve customers for drive-through, take out, and delivery. The order is in effect until 5 pm on Friday, May 22. However, the end of this Order does not necessarily mean the state will move to Phase 2. Phase 2 will only start if data and indicators are in the right place.

 

 

Recommendations from the NCDHHS to slow the spread of COVID-19

 

 

General Assembly – Committee Updates

 

 

Appropriations Committee – this committee discussed HB1038: Omnibus COVID-19 Respone Funds

 

 

Education Committee: this Committee discussed the Education Omnibus Bill that came from of our COVID-19 Education workgroup

 

Health Committee: this committee discussed the HB 1037 from the House Select COVID-19 Committee, Health Care Working Group

 

 

There are no additional updates on the other Committees for the month of April.



 

To follow up on daily updates on General Assembly News, visit ncleg.gov where you can learn more about proposed bills at session or new committees developed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Workgroups and Task Forces

 

Representative Gailliard serves on the following Workgroups at the General Assembly:

 

·    Agricultural and Rural Jobs

·    Broadband

·    Education Public Schools

·    Elections

·    Medicaid

 

Medicaid Workgroup- This workgroup discussed plans to expand Medicaid. HB1040, was created from this Workgroup to expand Medicaid in North Carolina and increase access to affordable health care for more than 500,000 North Carolinians. Representatives Gailliard, Batch, Brewer and Clark are primary sponsors on this bill.

 

There are no additional updates on the other Workgroups for the month of April.

 

Since the COVID-19 pandemic Representative Gailliard, was assigned to two task forces:

 

·    Developing a Representative and Inclusive Vision for Education (DRIVE) – this task force under the direction of Governor Roy Cooper, this task force will focus on improving equity and inclusion in education and to ensure quality in education. The task force is comprised of parents, educators, administrators, education advocates, representatives of state and local government, representatives from the University of North Carolina system and North Carolina Community College System, and employers with a presence in North Carolina

 

·    COVID-19 Large Gatherings Task Force Subgroup – a short-term workgroup Chaired by members of the COVID-19 Task Force and DHHS staff to devise a plan for the reopening of large gatherings in North Carolina that have been restricted as a result of COVID-19. Business leaders, faith based leaders and public health experts are included in this subgroup

 

General Assembly – Session

 

 

Session convened on April 28th and resulted in the passage of two bills last Saturday that addressed policy and funding. The first NC- specific COVID-19 Bills, totaling nearly 1.6 billion, were signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper earlier this week, to bring financial relief to our state.

 

You can read more details about the bills below:

·    Senate Bill 704

·    House Bill 1043

 

COVID-19 News

 

COVID-19 could cost up to $654 billion or $163.4 billion, depending on the infection rate. Health Affairs, https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/pdf/10.1377/hlthaff.2020.00426

 

Fauci: Coronavirus immunity cards for Americans are ‘being discussed.’ Politico, https://www.politico.com/news/2020/04/10/fauci-coronavirus-immunity-cards-for-americans-are-being-discussed-178784 

 

Apple, Google tweak contact tracing specs as launch nears. Axios, https://www.axios.com/apple-google-tweak-contact-tracing-specs-as-launch-nears-e76dee7c-350d-4143-8024-29dd0d3fd67f.html

 

Live tracker: How many coronavirus cases have been reported in each U.S. state? Politico, https://www.politico.com/interactives/2020/coronavirus-testing-by-state-chart-of-new-cases/

 

Can a pandemic push North Carolina to finally expand Medicaid? These House members hope so. NC Policy Watch, https://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2020/04/29/can-a-pandemic-push-north-carolina-to-finally-expand-medicaid-these-house-members-hope-so/

 

Furloughed employees in NC face tough return-to-work decision. News & Record, https://www.greensboro.com/news/state/furloughed-employees-in-nc-face-tough-return-to-work-decision/article_eef6a947-84b2-5498-8dd5-371ddc8a3c66.html

 

Eastern North Carolina hospitals cope with the financial realities of coronavirus. North Carolina Health News, https://www.northcarolinahealthnews.org/2020/05/01/eastern-north-carolina-vidant/

 

Federal Action:

·    PPP: President Trump signed a roughly $480 billion relief package today that includes $310 billion in new funding for small businesses hurt by the coronavirus outbreak along with other priorities like money for hospitals and expanded Covid-19 testing: https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/21/politics/chuck-schumer-coronavirus-relief-small-business-cnntv/index.html

 

·    ELECTIVE PROCEDURES: CMS announced new guidelines on how hospitals can move to “Phase I” of providing non-emergent, non-Covid-19 care in states and regions where coronavirus outbreaks are deemed under control. VP Pence today reiterated this plan: https://www.cms.gov/files/document/covid-flexibility-reopen-essential-non-covid-services.pdf 

 

·    FEDERAL DEFICIT: CBO says deficit will approach $4 trillion in 2020: https://www.cbo.gov/publication/56335

 

·    PRESIDENT’S GUIDELINES FOR OPENING UP AMERICA:

·    A three-phase process to restart the economy on a state-by-state basis. The plan would keep restrictions in place in the hardest-hit areas, with less-affected parts of the country to reopen sooner: https://www.politico.com/f/?id=00000171-84eb-d46f-affb-a5fbcb410000&nname=playbook&nid=0000014f-1646-d88f-a1cf-5f46b7bd0000&nrid=00000167-a478-d568-a567-a6fa76d70001&nlid=630318

 

·    RURAL RESOURCES: USDA’s COVID-19 Federal Rural Resource Guide Lists Federal Programs That Can Help Rural Communities, Organizations and Residents Impacted by COVID-19: https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2020/04/13/usda-unveils-tool-help-rural-communities-address-covid-19-pandemic

 

·    FACE COVERING: The CDC is recommending the use of a cloth face covering to keep people who are infected but do not have symptoms from spreading COVID-19 to others: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html

 

·    AT HOME TESTING: LabCorp receives FDA approval to sell at-home coronavirus test: https://www.wraltechwire.com/2020/04/21/labcorp-receives-fda-approval-to-sell-at-home-covid-19-test/

 

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues

Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation

 

 

 

Rep. James Gailliard, District 25 | 536 Legislative Office Building, Raleigh, NC 27601

 

From the Office of Representative Gailliard District 25 REP. GAILLIARD SUPPORTS COVID-19 RESPONSE BILL THAT PASSES NC HOUSE

Policy Update

STANDING COMMITTEES

2019-2020

· HEALTH

· APPROPRIATIONS

· APPROPRIATIONS EDUCATION

· EDUCATION K-12

· HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL SAFETY

Advocating for inclusive policies for Constituents in Nash County-Rocky Mount

From the Office of Representative Gailliard

District 25

300 North Salisbury Street

Raleigh, NC 27603

919-733-5802

Policy Update

REP. GAILLIARD SUPPORTS COVID-19 RESPONSE BILL THAT PASSES NC HOUSE

Yesterday, the North Carolina House of Representatives passed its first major COVID-19 response bill.

“There are a lot of people and small businesses hurting right now and I am proud to support a relief package that will help.”

House Bill 1043 passed the NC House yesterday. It now goes to the NC Senate for its consideration. The NC Senate yesterday passed a bill with much lower levels of support for public schools, public health, and assistance to local areas.

There are a lot of good parts to our relief package, but here are a few highlights:

* $75 million in small business assistance loans through Golden LEAF

* $50 million for Private Protective Equipment (PPE) and other COVID-19 supplies

* $25 million for expanded testing and tracing needed to get NC back to work

* $125 million for grants to North Carolina hospitals

* $80 million to help local schools with school nutrition

* $70 million for summer K-12 learning programs

* $82 million for remote K-12 learning

* $35 million for K-12 mental health services

* $25 million for North Carolina’s community colleges

* $79 million for North Carolina’s universities

* $110 million to create a COVID-19 Response Research Fund in state universities to work on a vaccine and other innovations

* $300 million for transportation projects and jobs to make up for declining gas tax revenue that normally funds transportation

* $350 million for local governments struggling with COVID-19 costs

* $25 million to public health departments and rural providers

* $40 million for COVID-19 Medicaid costs

* $25 million for behavioral health

* $6 million to food banks

* $25 million for domestic violence shelters, housing, and adult/child protective services

* $2.25 million for foster care

* $25 million for rural and underserved areas hard hit by the epidemic

“I am glad to work across party lines to support this bill. It is not perfect, but will do a lot of good. I will keep working on needed long-term fixes that we did not address yesterday like Medicaid Expansion, strengthening the unemployment system for laid-off workers, and improved family leave.”

Representative James D. Gailliard

committed to:

The People of Nash County-Rocky Mount

Progressive solutions for Rural Issues



Principles that foster Common Sense Legislation