Talking about Poverty In Edgecombe County what are some examples of someone living in poverty?

I posted this on my Facebook page Tuesday. I received some responses and they were okay but nobody was touching on where my mindset is so I couldn’t hold out any longer.

The following is where my mindset is.

Ok I try not to give my opinion about certain things until others have given theirs. I know many times my opinion drive the conversation.

The Senior Citizens are a great example of POVERTY.

I don’t want to hear about folk with children being in poverty as if they are the majority of the folk who are in POVERTY.

What everyone needs to understand is that there are some important folk who are doing jobs such as law enforcement, teachers and etc. that we need in place to provide a service for the masses.

In Edgecombe County law enforcement and some other positions are underpaid. We need these men and women to protect and to serve us. I am grateful of these folk putting their lives on the line daily for us but having to work 2 jobs just to be able to live comfortable with the basic necessities such as a place to live and a car to drive along with other basics.

We do ourselves a disservice many times by always talking about POVERTY in the negative only talking folk having all these babies and when they are not the majority. Yes that is an issue but that does nothing to the majority of the working folk who want to work and live a good life.

All I am saying is we need to find a way to deal with real POVERTY and it ain’t always having to do with babies, being uneducated and other negatives that becomes the topic of discussion.

I am talking about things that Edgecombe County need to be addressing whether something can be done or not.

Senior Citizens income is not governed by Edgecombe County so that is a bigger picture to deal with.

Just my ignant opinion.


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You Don’t Call the Police on Poverty – Spectacular Magazine

The Watch Dog response: This is an awesome article and should be read by everyone that can read.

“You don’t call the police on poverty…that’s exactly how Black lives become hashtags.”

I arrived at the Durham Co-op Market Monday morning January 02, 2017 for coffee and to finish some writing. As I approached the market’s front door, a middle-aged Black man standing on the side of the building, stopped me and asked for “spare change.”

Little did he know, I was four days from ‘pay day’ and had absolutely no money. I was living on a credit card for the next four days. I told him I was “out of cash” and kept walking.

As I entered the sliding glass doors, one of the cashiers asked, “Is that man still out there asking for money?” I said “Yes. But he’s not posing a threat to anyone. He’s just standing on the side and asking for spare change.” She then informed me that she had already spoken with him once that morning and that the manager had instructed her to call the police. (Read more)

Sex, Drugs and Poverty in Red and Blue America – New York Times

The Political Agitator response: Well can’t wait to see how this get twisted!

Take the statistics in the first chart, which was produced from data collected and analyzed by Child Trends, an organization that conducts research on the quality of children’s lives. It shows that for the last few decades the out-of-wedlock birthrate among African-Americans — exceptionally high at more than 70 percent — has risen less rapidly than the white rate. Among African-Americans, the out-of-wedlock birthrate has gone from 57.3 percent in 1980 to 71.4 percent in 2013, an increase of 25 percent; the white rate over the same time period has gone up 205 percent, from 9.6 percent to 29.3 percent.

The highest rates of white teenage pregnancy in the 30 states with available data are in red states. While the national white teenage pregnancy rate in 2010 was 38 per 1,000, white rates were at least 10 points higher in nine states: Oklahoma (59), West Virginia (64), Arkansas (63), South Carolina (51), Alabama (49), Mississippi (55), Tennessee (51), Kentucky (59) and Louisiana (51). Each of these states cast decisive majorities for Romney in 2012. (Source: Read more)

Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person… – Occupy Wall Street

Years ago, some feminist on the internet told me I was “Privileged.”

I came from the kind of Poor that people don’t want to believe still exists in this country. Have you ever spent a frigid northern Illinois winter without heat or running water? I have. At twelve years old, were you making ramen noodles in a coffee maker with water you fetched from a public bathroom? I was. Have you ever lived in a camper year round and used a random relative’s apartment as your mailing address? We did. Did you attend so many different elementary schools that you can only remember a quarter of their names?

So when that feminist told me I had “white privilege,” I told her that my white skin didn’t do shit to prevent me from experiencing poverty. Then, like any good, educated feminist would, she directed me to Peggy McIntosh’s 1988 now-famous piece, “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” (Source: Read more)