Senate votes to override Cooper on abortion bill – WRAL

The Political Agitator’s response: Saturday the 1st Congressional District Convention was held and I was expecting to hear about what was going on on the State Level. I thought I was going to find out what was going on on the National Level but Congressman G.K. Butterfield could not attend. The speaker ended up being the Sheriff of Pitt County and I had an issue with that because the Edgecombe County Sheriff has not addressed the convention so how do you bring in another Sheriff. This was not following protocol in my opinion and I texted Sen. Davis when I heard on the radio while in route to the convention that Congressman G.K. Butterfield was not going to be the speaker but the Sheriff of Pitt County. Also over the weekend I received a call from a friend from another county and while we were talking he brought up Sen. Davis name saying someone said we need to be checking Sen. Davis voting record because it appears he has voting with the Republicans. Well I believe this confirms such.

RALEIGH, N.C. — The Senate voted to override Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto of an abortion bill Tuesday evening.

The Republican-controlled chamber managed the three-fifths threshold required by a single vote – with the help of one Democrat.

Sen.

Don Davis

, D-Pitt, one of just two Senate Democrats to vote for the bill the first time out, stuck to his vote Tuesday and went against the governor. He left the chamber after adjournment without comment.

Sen.

Ben Clark

, D-Hoke, also voted for the bill when it was before the chamber earlier this year, but he backed the governor and voted against the override.

The bill now heads back to the House on Thursday, and Republicans face tougher math there if they’re to fully overturn Cooper’s veto and make the bill law.

Senate Bill 359 would make it a felony for doctors to fail to perform life-saving measures on a baby born alive after a botched abortion, and it creates a new duty for nurses and other staff to report these doctors. Bills like this cropped up in a number of states this year after a similar measure failed to pass the U.S. Senate. (Read more)

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Cooper says he’ll call special session on redistricting – News & Observer

RALEIGH

Gov. Roy Cooper, trying to put pressure on lawmakers to redraw state House and Senate election maps within the next two weeks, said he would call for a 14-day special session of the legislature.

The session Cooper plans to call would run simultaneously with the ongoing regular session, which is due to end some time this summer. He said such a concurrent session is rare but not unprecedented.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed a lower court ruling that found 28 legislative districts to be illegal racial gerrymanders that diluted the overall influence of black voters.

“That means Republican politicians have been picking their voters instead of voters picking their politicians,” Cooper said Wednesday. “They’ve rigged the system and it’s just wrong.”

But the justices vacated an order by the lower court to redraw the maps and hold special elections in 2017 in the changed districts. That three-judge panel will now reconsider the means of correcting the problem.

Cooper said the special session would start Thursday. (Read more)

Board of Elections Status As Of May 27, 2017 Thank You Governor Roy Cooper For Continuing To File Lawsuits

Cooper has already sued lawmakers over other measures they passed in the December special session, including merging the State Board of Elections and the State Ethics Commission, requiring Senate confirmation of his cabinet secretaries and sharply reducing the number of political appointments he could make in state agencies.

A three-judge panel ruled in his favor on the elections-ethics and political appointments issues but said the cabinet confirmations process doesn’t violate the state constitution. After lawmakers tweaked the elections-ethics combination to meet the judges’ concerns and passed it over his veto, he filed a second lawsuit over the matter.

Source: WRAL

Cooper again challenges lawmakers over appointment powers – WRAL

Raleigh, N.C. — Gov. Roy Cooper on Friday filed another lawsuit against legislative leaders, accusing them of overstepping their authority in reducing the size of the state Court of Appeals and in controlling various state boards.

The lawsuit marks the third time Cooper and lawmakers will battle in court since his election six months ago.

The General Assembly in March approved legislation cutting the Court of Appeals from 15 judges to 12 as three older judges reach the mandatory retirement age of 72. The move prevented Cooper from naming people to serve the remainder of the judges’ terms. He vetoed the bill, but lawmakers overrode the veto. (Read more)

NC asks for $900M in flood relief, feds give $6.1M, Cooper says – WRAL

The Watch Dog response: Thank you Senator for standing with our Governor. I have been saying since Matthew that folk better recognize who was in office. I told them these Republicans ain’t gonna want to do anything and if they did it would be very little. I said and the next time around if they are still in control they will not get anything.

Raleigh, N.C. — North Carolina asked the federal government for $900 million to help relieve parts of the state ravaged by Hurricane Matthew flood waters, but the government only offered $6.1 million, Gov. Roy Cooper said in a news conference on Wednesday. The $6 million of relief money is less than 1 percent of what the state asked for.

“I am deeply disappointed that Washington isn’t making North Carolina’s urgent need a top priority,” the governor said.

“Matthew did an estimated $4.8 billion in damages to 50 counties in North Carolina,” Cooper said during a news conference about the state’s preparations for hurricane season. “That’s half of our entire state.” (Read more)

Senator Smith-Ingram’s Statement on Hurricane Matthew Funding

The Watch Dog response: Thank you Senator for standing with our Governor. I have been saying since Matthew that folk better recognize who was in office. I told them these Republicans ain’t gonna want to do anything and if they did it would be very little. I said and the next time around if they are still in control they will not get anything.

I am in agreement with Governor Roy Cooper’s sentiments. The Trump Administration and Congress’ measly funding for federal disaster for Hurricane Matthew were extremely disappointing. It’s less than 1 percent of what the state requested.

Governor Cooper requested more than $900 million in federal relief which is quite a conservative request in comparison to the damage done by Hurricane Matthew. Only $6.1 million in federal money was approved. This isn’t even enough to bring affected areas back to “prior fund damage” levels.

What I’d hoped for was exactly what our Governor requested for federal funding for:

▪ Housing repairs: $166 million for homeowners’ repairs, $63.7 million to repair rental housing, $15.2 million to repair public housing.

▪ Agriculture: $92.6 million to cover losses the U.S. Department of Agriculture didn’t cover, such as livestock, equipment and feed.

▪ Small business: $39 million to help close to 700 small businesses.

The above areas had the most impact in my District.

I call upon my Senate leaders to come up with additional funding, either through an immediate supplemental spending bill or in the next appropriations process to provide the much needed investment in recovery.

Being that North Carolina was underfunded at the federal level, it is unacceptable and shameful that the Senate budget fails North Carolinians affected by the storm. Hurricane Matthew was a catastrophic event that is best responded to outside of our biennium budget process. The appropriations should have never been included with the limitations of a $22.9 billion spending cap. We can do better than this. We are better than this. This budget does not reflect it!

Cooper vetoes court, elections bills – WRAL

Raleigh, N.C. — Gov. Roy Cooper on Friday issued the second and third vetoes of his administration, rejecting bills that would cut the size of the state Court of Appeals and would combine the state boards that oversee elections and ethics complaints.

Lawmakers last week approved legislation that would reduce the Court of Appeals from 15 judges to 12 in the next couple of years as three older judges hit the mandatory retirement age. Normally, Cooper would be able to name replacements to serve out the remainder of the judges’ terms. (Read more)