New charter school aims to open in city – Rocky Mount Telegram

So did the Black school board members shut this school down saying it was not suitable for being a school? Who were and what was the motive behind this if the school is now suitable for housing students? I am asking for me because I attended several meetings about the closing of the school and we tried to keep it open. Where were the groups that have formed recently at then since they love Rocky Mount so much? Inquiring minds want to know.

New charter school aims to open in city

A new charter school may be on the horizon for the Twin Counties as soon as next year.

According to information recently released by the state Department of Public Instruction, a new charter school called New Generation Charter Academy hopes to open in Edgecombe County in the fall of 2020.

The proposed charter school, which proposes to open under the management of Torchlight Academy Schools according to the state, is one of five applications on an accelerated track for consideration of approval for the coming year.

The deadline to submit a fast-track or acceleration application through the state’s Epicenter automated application system for 2020 was July 29. Each applicant was required to pay a $1,000 application fee and perform criminal background checks on its proposed board members in addition to providing a detailed description of the proposed school’s mission, goals, education plan, operations and governance plan and financial plan, according to a press release from the Department of Public Instruction. (Read more)

Exposing the charter school lie: Michelle Rhee, Louis C.K. and the year phony education reform revealed its true colors – Salon

The Political Agitator response: This is quite interesting.

Since it’s the time of the year when newspapers, websites and television talk shows scan their archives to pick the person, place or thing that sums up the year in entertainment, business, sports or every other venue, why not do that for education too?

In 2014 education news, lots of personalities came and went.

Michelle Rhee gave way to Campbell Brown as a torchbearer for “reform.” The comedian Louis C. K. had a turn at becoming an education wonk with his commentary on the Common Core standards. Numerous “Chiefs for Change” toppled from the ranks of chiefdom. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett went down in defeat due in part to his gutting of public schools, as Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker remained resilient while spreading the cancerous voucher program from Milwaukee to the rest of the state. (Source: Read more)

The great charter school rip-off: Finally, the truth catches up to education “reform” phonies – Salon

Last week when former President Bill Clinton meandered onto the topic of charter schools, he mentioned something about an “original bargain” that charters were, according to the reporter for The Huffington Post, “supposed to do a better job of educating students.”

A writer at Salon called the remark “stunning” because it brought to light the fact that the overwhelming majority of charter schools do no better than traditional public schools. Yet, as the Huffington reporter reminded us, charter schools are rarely shuttered for low academic performance.

But what’s most remarkable about what Clinton said is how little his statement resembles the truth about how charters have become a reality in so many American communities. (Source: Read more)

West Palm Beach, FL – Charter School for At-Risk Youth Facing Eviction

Charter School for At-Risk Youth Facing Eviction

West Palm Beach, FL — April, 2009 After a decade of service to Palm Beach County’s disaffected youth, the students and faculty of the only African-centered charter school in the State of Florida are hoping to weather a storm of financial uncertainty.
The national economic crisis is dire. Foreclosures, failing banks and unemployment are the fodder for incessant headlines and office water cooler conversations around the country.
Budget cuts and furloughs are affecting South Florida public schools, as well, including the Joseph Littles- Nguzo Saba Charter School in West Palm Beach, which is struggling to keep its doors open.
The school for at- risk youth has been unable to make its rent payments. School founder Amefika Geuka said he believes the school will continue to defy the odds, as it has in the past.
He said the school’s financial issues are a result of inadequate funding from the state, along with a number of severe budget cuts this year.
Geuka said, he, the faculty and staff are discussing several options in case the eviction becomes a reality. They are thinking about how to make a smooth transition for the sake of the students. Your support can help us reach our goal of raising $150,000 to keep the school open for these children.
Richard Keitel, landlord for the school’s facilities, said he agrees that the students should come first. He said he will try to hold off from the eviction for as long as he can, adding that he hopes to work something out with Geuka for the sake of the children.
"I have been carrying the school because I’m in a position to do so at the moment,” Keitel said. "I don’t want to take action that will harm the students."
We have made a modest beginning with just over $6,000.00 from small contributions all across the country. While billion dollar bailouts are being considered for Wall Street, your support is needed to keep the doors open for this school which is helping the least of us. CLICK HERE to make a secure online donation.
The Thompson Family

Paula Thompson, with children Curtis, Alexander, Corey and Yolanda
Photo by Elgin Jones, South Florida Times

Mrs. Paula Thompson is a working mother of three children who graduated from the school, and one who is currently enrolled there. She strongly believes that the teaching style and uniqueness of the charter school has brought her children much more educational success than regular public school. She is active in school life of children. She says, "Someone told me about the school, and when my children went there, I felt like I was a part of a family who were committed to taking care of my children. Alex started in 4th grade. His grades were great. He has always has been a good student. We moved from New York, and liked this school much better. He is in 11th grade, and he wants to go to college and study Marine Biology."
"Mr. Geuka is like a father to the children,” she said. "And the staff pays close attention to each child’s individual needs. They act as parent substitutes."
In spite of the struggle to keep his school alive, Geuka said he refuses to turn his back on his community and the foundation he started. Faculty members do not merely address formal and academic education, but also a social and self- disciplinary education. The school provides students with a sense of family and belonging that is best suited to meet their individual learning needs, Geuka said.
"Our school is special because the children are at the center of the universe," he said. "The whole world revolves around them."

Our only failure in response to this appeal would be to do nothing. Any contribution is acceptable. Be as generous as your means will allow.

DONATE NOW!
If contributing by check, your tax deductible contribution should be mailed to:
Joseph Littles-Nguzo Saba Charter School
5829 Corporate Way, West Palm Beach, Fl. 33407
ATTN: Amefika Geuka

CONTACT: Amefika Geuka
Email: jlnscs@yahoo.com

Telephone: (561) 689-1536