Rep. Shelly Willingham Newsletter – Thursday May 28, 2015

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Rep. Shelly Willingham

N.C. House of Representatives

501 N Salisbury Street, #501

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603

(919) 715-3024

(919) 754-3224 (fax)

shellyw@ncleg.net

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Representative Shelly Willingham

Dedicated to District 23

May 28, 2015

DISTRICT 23

Edgecombe

Martin

COMMITTEES

Agriculture

Alcoholic Beverage Control

Appropriations

Appropriations –   Information Technology

Banking

Education-Universities

Elections

Judiciary IV

HOUSE & SENATE COMMITTEE MEETINGS & SESSION INFO:

www.ncleg.net

HOUSE BUDGET SUMMARY

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13 of 18 Democratic Amendments Adopted Mitigate Damage in House Budget

RALEIGH, NC – House Democrats successfully added the majority of their amendments, that made it to a vote on the House budget.   Democrats offered 18 amendments that were voted on and 13 of the 18 were adopted.

“We were able to mitigate some of the damage in this budget through our amendments that passed on the floor.  The budget should have reflected the priorities of the people of North Carolina yet it fails to retain our best teachers.    Sadly, it fails to raise incomes for middle-class families, fails to recruit new jobs, and – after losing Volvo to South Carolina – fails to make North Carolina competitive,” said Democratic Leader Larry Hall.

“The budget does not address the needs of the majority of the people in this state.   Republicans made devastating cuts in the last several budgets and this budget does not repair that damage. Contrary to claims of support for education, this budget failed to put teacher assistants back into our classrooms.   These micro increases that do not completely restore or surpass support levels prior to Republican cuts do not materially support education, our economy, or the needs of the people.”

Adopted Democratic Floor Amendments:

· Lottery Funds to supplement, not supplant, public education funding

· Disclosure on Use of Lottery Proceeds

· Corner Store Initiative – “Healthy Food Small Retailers”

· $200k of UNC funds to be used for repairs to World War Memorial Stadium at NC A&T State University

· Repeal Closing of Department of Revenue Rocky Mount Call Center

· Joint Study of Justice and Public Safety and Behavioral Health

· Targeted Case Management Services Pilot Program

· Report of Hospice Residential Beds

· Residential Hospice Funds used for non-profit and publicly funded hospice related care facilities

· Grants for Body-Worn Video Cameras for Law Enforcement Agencies

· Collaboration with State Board of Education with Regional Education Service Alliances

· Workers’ Compensation Claims

· DOT funds allocated to each county based on pavement condition scores

House Budget Faces Uncertain Future

McCrory proposed a $21.5 billion General Fund budget for 2015-16, and $22.2 billion for 2016-17. The House budget is set at $22.2 billion the first year and $22.4 billion the second. The chamber’s plan is a 6.3 percent increase for the biennium over the 2014-15 budget.  Asked for a reaction to the House proposal, McCrory spokesman Rick Martinez responded, “The governor stands by his budget.” “I would imagine [Senate leader Phil] Berger, and the leadership of many of our senators, want to maintain what we have accomplished with tax reform, and actually move it in the direction of less credits, less deductions and exemptions, and continue lowering the rates,” said Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, co-chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. 

Read More: www.carolinajournal.com.

HOUSE PASSES BILL ALLOWING MAGISTRATES TO OPT OUT OF SAME SEX MARRIAGES

The N.C. House voted 65-45 Wednesday to allow magistrates to opt out of performing weddings – legislation that stems from the legalization of same-sex marriages in North Carolina last year.  Because the House made no changes to the legislation already approved by the Senate, it will go directly to Gov. Pat McCrory.  In March, McCrory voiced concerns about the bill and said he won’t sign it. He stopped short; however, of saying he would veto it.  The governor can allow bills to become law without his signature. Senate Bill 2 would allow magistrates and register of deeds employees to be exempt from performing weddings if they have a religious objection. 

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article22486821.html

FEDS: NC FOOD STAMP APPROVAL TIME AMONG SLOWEST IN THE NATION

The federal government is again threatening to withdraw operational funding for North Carolina’s food stamp program – this time over the speed at which health officials are approving applications. In a letter to the state’s health agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said North Carolina social services workers failed to approve applications within the required 30-day window, or one week for emergency applications. In 2013, the state processed those applications an average of 75 percent of the time, ranking fifth from the bottom when compared to the rest of the country. This means North Carolina lags behind neighbors Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina and even territories such as the Virgin Islands and Guam. 

Read more here: http://www.wral.com/feds-nc-food-stamp-approval-among-slowest-in-nation/14670357/

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From The Office Of Rep. Shelly Willingham

 

 

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Rep. Shelly Willingham

N.C. House of Representatives

501 N Salisbury Street, #501

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603

(919) 715-3024

(919) 754-3224 (fax)

shellyw@ncleg.net

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Representative Shelly Willingham

        Dedicated to District 23

April 2, 2015

 

DISTRICT 23

Edgecombe

Martin

 

COMMITTEES

Agriculture

Alcoholic Beverage Control

Appropriations

Appropriations –   Information Technology

Banking

Education-Universities

Elections

Judiciary IV

 

 

Please contact me with your concerns. 

 

The audio legislative session is available at http://www.ncleg.net.  Select “Audio and then House or Senate Chamber, Appropriations Committee Room or Press Conference Room

 

WISHING YOU A

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NC HOUSE & SENATE

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GOVERNOR SIGNS GAS TAX BILL

Senate Bill 20 would lower the state gas tax from 37.5 cents per gallon to 36 cents per gallon on Wednesday. But it would cancel out a much larger cut to the gas tax scheduled to take effect in July. Rep. David Lewis, R-Harnett, said the current formula by which the gas tax is calculated, passed 25 years ago, is outdated and too inherently unstable to allow the state to plan for road and bridge construction and maintenance.  Rep. Paul Luebke, D-Durham, took issue with the GOP characterization of the measure as a tax cut. “Consumers of this state need to know that, on July 1, in rounded terms, they’ll be paying 6 cents more for a gallon of gas,” Luebke said. “I think it’s important for people to know that.”  Read more here: http://www.wral.com/gas-tax-changes-head-to-governor/14551663/

 

NC BILL SIMILAR TO INDIANA’S “RELIGIOUS FREEDOM” LEGISLATION

North Carolina legislation that’s similar to Indiana’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act could come up for debate in the state House as soon as this week. Identical bills were filed just last week in the House and Senate. And by Monday, there were signs that the firestorm that greeted Indiana’s recently enacted law could spread to North Carolina if the predominantly Republican legislature goes ahead with a similar measure. Critics said the legislation would provide legal cover for businesses and individuals who discriminate against gays and lesbians. That charge was disputed by conservative Christian leaders, who said North Carolina needs a law to protect people as they exercise the religious liberty guaranteed in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. 

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article16956950.html

 

SENATE BILL GUTS REVENUE FOR CITIES, TOWNS

When state Sen. Harry Brown presented a plan this week to change how the state distributes sales tax revenues, few understood that language in the legislation would cause about half of North Carolina’s cities and towns to lose money. Brown, a Jacksonville Republican, acknowledged Friday that he is among them. Brown’s bill, which has the support of Senate Republican leadership, was introduced late Monday along with a chart showing that about 90 of the state’s 100 counties would gain revenue over a five-year span under the change. The plan would distribute sales tax revenue based on each county’s population, instead of allocating it by where goods are sold. 

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article16538819.html

 

COMPETING MEDICAID BILLS FILED

House Bill 372 and Senate Bill 574 serve as placeholders for legislators, including Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, trying to find common ground over differences.  Compromise discussions have been taking place formally for at least four months.

Two more bills — Senate bills 696 and 703 — revive dramatic measures, one of which failed to get out of a joint legislative oversight commission in February.  Senate Bill 701 would forbid the state from providing financing to primary care case management programs, such as Community Care of N.C. 

Read more here: http://www.journalnow.com/news/local/n-c-legislators-file-competing-bills-to-reform-medicaid/article_3f01bb3e-d802-11e4-abcb-f7f5710e28ca.html

 

AUDITS FIND DEFICIENCIES, ERRORS AT COMMERCE, DHHS

During an audit period, the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Employment Security determined it had overpaid $50 million in unemployment insurance benefits in 54,527 cases; however, as many as one-quarter might not have required documentation to support the department’s conclusion, according to an audit….A wide-ranging audit of the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services…found problems in many areas, including Medicaid, Vocational Rehabilitation and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, to name three. Instances of noncompliance included making overpayments to medical providers and errors with enrolling and terminating medical providers. In addition, auditors determined that the agency, led by Secretary Aldona Wos, did not implement full correction action on prior recommendations from the previous audit on DHHS. 

Read http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2015/03/31/audit-nc-commerce-records-unemployment-insurance.html

 

Read  http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2015/03/31/audit-finds-30-deficiencies-or-errors-with-dhhs.html

 

NATIONAL CHARTER CHAINS COULD GET EASIER PATH IN NC

Charter schools run by national chains would have an easier time branching out in North Carolina under a bill proposed by a powerful state senator. Senate Bill 456 would direct the state Board of Education to come up with a new process and set of rules for charter schools run by for-profit or nonprofit management companies to be able to replicate their model across the state.  This would apply to chains such as the for-profit Charter Schools USA or nonprofit KIPP. Both have at least one school in the Charlotte area and have plans for more.  http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/education/your-schools-blog/article16934984.html

 

NEW BILL WOULD ALTER ABORTION LAWS

A bill filed by some Republican House members Wednesday would change certain restrictions on abortions. Those opposed to this bill said it would drastically change abortion in North Carolina. The bill would:

  • Increase the waiting period to get an abortion from 24 hours to 72 hours
  • Require that the procedure would need to be done by a licensed obstetrician or gynecologist
  • Ban abortions at the medical schools at the University of North Carolina and East Carolina or facilities owned by them.

Read more here: http://www.wncn.com/story/28699021/new-bill-would-alter-nc-abortion-laws

 

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Newsletter: Rep. Shelly Willingham District 23 February 16, 2015

 

 

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Rep. Shelly Willingham

N.C. House of Representatives

501 N Salisbury Street, #501

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603

(919) 715-3024

(919) 754-3224 (fax)

shellyw@ncleg.net

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Edgecombe  Martin

        Dedicated to District 23

February 16, 2015

 

2015-2016 COMMITTEES:

Agriculture

Alcoholic Beverage Control

Appropriations

Appropriations –   Information Technology

Banking

Education-Universities

Elections

Judiciary IV

 

 

 

Please contact me with your concerns. 

 

The audio legislative session is available at http://www.ncleg.net.  Select “Audio and then House or Senate Chamber, Appropriations Committee Room or Press Conference Room.

THE DISTRICT

 

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·       ALLISON DURHAM (Martin County) appointed to the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences Advisory Commission.

 

·       MARK PETRUZZIELLO (Edgecombe County) appointed to the Edgecombe County Community College Board of Trustees.

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RALEIGH & STATE NEWS

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NC COMEBACK?  NOT FOR WAGES

A strong recovery should mean bigger paychecks. And yet, wage growth has been decidedly lackluster in the last several years, a sure sign that North Carolina’s comeback is far from complete.  Despite corporate profits being at an all-time high and productivity increasing, the recovery has not translated into improved earnings for the average worker.  The latest data from December 2014 shows that across the state average wages have remained flat year over year and in eight of the state’s fourteen metro areas average wages have fallen.  Economists generally say that wage growth needs to be at least 3.5 to 4 percent to deliver returns to worker’s paychecks or at least to ensure that labor is enjoying a stable share of the benefits of a recovering economy.

http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2015/02/11/economic-comeback-in-nc-not-when-it-comes-to-the-wages-real-people-are-bringing-home/

 

NC EXPORTS UP—ALONG WITH IMPORTS

North Carolina imports more than all but 12 states, but ranks 15th among the states in terms of exports. Canada represents North Carolina’s largest export partner, accounting for 22 percent of the state’s sales, followed by Mexico at 10 percent and China with 9 percent. “North Carolina’s continued export growth shows the international demand for the quality products made in our state,” said Gov. Pat McCrory in a statement.  “The global economy offers increasing export opportunities, and we’re ready to make the link in services and assistance North Carolina companies need to grow and create jobs here at home.”  McCrory’s press office did not immediately return a request for comment on the trade deficit.

http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2015/02/09/north-carolina-2014-exports-trade-deficit-increase.html

 

SEANC DIRECTOR DANA COPE RESIGNS

The longtime executive director of the State Employees Association of North Carolina has resigned amid questions about possible financial improprieties at the group.  Dana Cope announced his departure Tuesday. “In recent days, I’ve come to realize that in carrying out the duties of my job, I have blurred the line between my personal life and my professional life,” said Cope.  The News & Observer of Raleigh reported Sunday that the association had paid $109,000 in unbid landscaping work to a company that also worked at Cope’s home.  The article also detailed spending of more than $8,000 for flight lessons for Cope and personal expenses paid with association credit cards that included eyebrow waxing.

http://abc11.com/politics/seanc-executive-director-dana-cope-resigns/511755/

NEW HOUSE SPEAKER MEETS WITH REV. BARBER

House Speaker Tim Moore met for about an hour today with Rev. William Barber and other leaders of the “Moral Monday” movement, which has led protests against Republican-crafted policies at the General Assembly building for the past two years. It marked the first time since protests began at the General Assembly that a sitting House speaker had met with Barber and protest leaders.  Barber said U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis, who served as House speaker during the last four years, had never agreed to meet with protest leaders.

http://www.wral.com/speaker-moore-meets-with-moral-monday-leaders/14440411/#0VGTuCFrwRsFrDSI.99

 

 

Two Vacancy Announcements & Business & Networking Expo

 

Email Alert from the Office of Rep. Angela R. Bryant, NC House District 7 Proudly Representing Halifax and Nash Counties until Jan. 2013; and Nash and Franklin Counties – Jan 2013 – 2014

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**TWO JOB VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENTS &

BUSINESS & NETWORKING EXPO**

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1.

 

The Executive Source

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Chief Executive Officer

Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines

Raleigh Headquarters

Position to be Filled January/February 2013

 

 

THE OPPORTUNITY

 

Girl Scouting is currently celebrating its 100th Anniversary as the preeminent girl-focused organization in the United States.  It remains unsurpassed in its ability to create opportunities for the empowerment of girls through the collaboration of girls, families, volunteers, staff, community partners, and funders.  Girl Scouting helps girls discover their own sense of self, connect with others in an increasingly diverse world, and take action to make the world a better place.

 

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Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines announces a broad-based search for CEO due to the upcoming retirement of its CEO in January 2013.  Building on the successes of recent years and the traditions of its legacy councils, the incoming CEO will lead the Council to provide Girl Scouting’s pre-eminent personal and leadership development programs for girls ages 5-17 in all parts of the jurisdiction.   

 

The CEO is accountable for providing leadership, strategic direction and vision for the development and achievement of the organization’s mission in partnership with the Council’s board of directors.  In addition, the CEO directs the Council’s day-to-day operations through the senior management team.  Of particular importance is advancing the Council’s relevance in the community through outreach to and collaboration with community partners.   Responsible for stewardship of the Council’s human, material and fiscal assets, the CEO provides oversight for policies and practices that affect members, staff and volunteers.  The CEO plays a crucial role, in conjunction with the board of directors, in risk management and mitigation covering girl and adult members’ physical risk, financial and business operational risk and brand risk.  Of critical importance is developing and implementing a communications strategy that enhances the image of the Council and effectively reaches out to the diverse population of the Council’s jurisdiction.  The CEO will play a key role in planning, managing and implementing program, revenue and fund development initiatives of the Council.   

 

Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines has current girl membership of 33,500 girls, 10,000+ adult volunteers and a staff of 71 full-time employees.  Its annual operating budget is $8.5 million, with a recent capital budget of $0.5 million.  It maintains 3 service centers and 6 program sites with out-based staff at 12 offices. 

 

CEO QUALIFICATIONS

 

The CEO will possess solid C-level business skills with a minimum of 7 years’ executive level experience including P/L accountability, and 8 or more years in managerial roles of progressive responsibility.  In addition, we seek excellence across a broad range of executive and managerial functions, including financial management, fund development, business development, planning, board relations, staff/volunteer relations, and the use of social media for business communications.  Of particular importance will be demonstrated leadership within or on behalf of organizations that are highly reliant on volunteers and that serve a youth membership constituency.  It is expected that candidates will possess a minimum of an undergraduate degree, with advanced degree preferred. 

 

Personal attributes of the CEO will include a girl-centered attitude, dedication to the mission of Girl Scouting at all times, and the drive to be the voice for girls throughout the Council’s jurisdiction.  The CEO will be a person of strong ideals and integrity who has a combination of vision, strategic, and operational planning abilities and who can serve as a role model of best management practices and solid decision-making.  The new CEO will possess a style of leadership that embraces partnerships, is collaborative, and that empowers stakeholders to achieve their highest potential, all the while meeting mutually agreed upon accountability measures.  The CEO will be recognized as a community leader in the Council’s jurisdiction, or have the executive presence and profile to achieve this quickly after appointment. 

 

Skilled corporate, non-profit, and higher education executives dedicated to providing world-class leadership development opportunities for the girls of eastern North Carolina are encouraged to apply for this outstanding executive leadership position.  If this is your background and you share a passion for advancing the lives of girls, we want to speak with you.

 

COMPENSATION/BENEFITS

 

The Council offers a competitive compensation plan commensurate with the qualifications and experience of the individual selected.  There is a comprehensive benefits package, including generous time off, health, dental, vision, life and LTD insurance options, self-directed 403(b) Thrift plan, including company match, flexible spending plan option, and other attractive features.  Relocation support will be considered. 

 

 

THE COMMUNITIES AND JURISDICTION SERVED

 

The Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines serves 41 counties in central and eastern North Carolina with a diversified economy representing (among others) – agribusiness and agriculture, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, defense, hospitality industries, information technology and software development companies, and nationally ranked research and healthcare universities.  The Council’s headquarters in Raleigh, NC is very close to the Research Triangle Park with its Fortune 100 companies as well many entrepreneurial ventures.  The Triangle has over one million residents with an international airport, rail service covering the east coast and excellent interstate highways.  Central and eastern North Carolina is justifiably proud of its people, historic places and beach and mountain recreational opportunities.

 

Council web site:   http://www.nccoastalpines.org

 

HOW TO APPLY

 

Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines is an equal opportunity employer.

 

We encourage expressions of interest as early as possible to accommodate the Council’s need to fill this important position by early 2013.  For consideration, please e-mail your cover letter and resume along with salary history to: 

 

Bob Perodeau, Principal

Evergreen Executive Source, LLC

E-mail:  evergreen.source@att.net

P.O. Box 412  Haddonfield, NJ 08033-0412

Voice (800) 221 6663    www.egreensource.com

 

Providing executive recruiting services to Girl Scouts of the USA since 2001

 

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2.

North Carolina General Assembly

Legislative Services Office

George R. Hall, Legislative Services Officer

 

 

 

August 29, 2012

 

*Vacancy Number: 1099-030951                 Position:         Legislative Analyst

Hiring Range:  $75,000-$110,000                 Working Title:    Medicaid /Mental                                                                                                              Health Staff Attorney

 

Closing Date:    September 12, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.               Division:         Research

 

*Vacancy number must be included on the application.

 

Interested applicants may obtain a General Assembly Application by requesting one from the address at the end of this announcement, by calling (919) 715-1210, by sending an electronic mail request to Judy.Braudwell@ncleg.net, or by visiting our web site at http://www.ncleg.net/NCGAInfo/Directories/Jobs.html.

 

 

Overview-Research Division of the North Carolina General Assembly

The nonpartisan employees of the Research Division provide legal analysis, policy research, general information, and legislative drafting services for the 170 members of the North Carolina General Assembly. The employees of the Research Division serve as staff to the standing and study committees of the General Assembly. Employees are generally assigned to specified subject areas, may specialize in one or more subject areas, or may cover a range of subjects. 

 

Overview of the Medicaid/Mental Health Staff Attorney/Legislative Analyst Position

The Medicaid/Mental Health Staff Attorney/Legislative Analyst will serve as legal counsel and staff to standing and study committees of the House and Senate in the North Carolina General Assembly, specifically working with Health and Human Services Appropriations Committees and Subcommittees.  The employee in this position will provide legal counsel and advice to General Assembly members individually and collectively on the structure and delivery of Medicaid programs and services within the framework of State and federal laws, rules, and regulations. The employee in this position must have a strong working knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the United States Supreme Court Olmstead decision and their applicability to health and mental health services. This employee will work collaboratively with the staffs of the Fiscal Research and Bill Drafting Divisions.  

Duties of the position:

A Legislative Analyst, under general supervision:

·       Performs legal and policy research and analysis; gathers and analyzes information; writes reports, memos, and papers; and drafts legislation for legislative committees and individual legislators.

·       Coordinates the operations of a committee, interim committee, or commission with committee chairs and legislative staff, and answers questions of and makes presentations to legislative committees.

·       Develops work priorities, methods, and assignments at the request of or in consultation with legislators, supervisors, or other staff and then works independently to complete tasks.

·       Develops a specialized base of knowledge in assigned areas.

·       Staffs standing legislative and interim committees, consults with chairs to develop agendas and identify speakers, assists with meeting arrangements, and prepares background materials.

·       Compiles data and conducts legal or general research for legislative committees and individual legislators and presents alternative solutions as directed.

·       Meets with interest groups and government agencies on behalf of committees and individual legislators.

·       Summarizes and analyzes detailed documents, legislation, periodicals, and other written material.

·       Maintains research files and study records.

·       Reviews committee minutes.

·       Submits work product to the office director or designee for review of content, style, form, accuracy, objectivity, and consistency.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Preferred:

 

·       Working knowledge of the ADA and the United States Supreme Court Olmstead decision as it impacts the delivery of health and mental health services in North Carolina.

·       Ability to offer advice and counsel to members of the General Assembly on issues related to State compliance with the ADA and Olmstead.

·       Working knowledge of Medicaid programs and services and the delivery of services at the State level.

·       Knowledge of the Medicaid State Plan amendment process, the Medicaid waiver process, and experience with the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

·       Knowledge of how other states have successfully achieved community integration and provided supported housing and community health and mental health services.

·       Considerable knowledge of the principles, techniques, and procedures of public policy research and analysis.

·       Considerable knowledge of federal, state, and local government organization and functions, including the legislative process.

·       Ability to maintain composure and work cooperatively under pressure with legislators, legislative staff, and the public on a daily basis.

·       Ability to work objectively and impartially with members of all political parties and on all policy issues and with respect to issues of the State.

·       Ability to understand and interpret constitutional provisions, statutes, administrative regulations, precedents, and legal opinions.

·       Ability to analyze facts, evidence, and legal instruments.

·       Ability to work collaboratively and cooperatively with other staff in a team setting.

·       Ability to prepare opinions and to draft legal and legislative documents.

·       Ability to present information clearly and concisely, both orally and in writing.

·       Ability to function as a conscientious employee with a strong work ethic who pays attention to work product and process details.

·       Ability to perform both under general supervision and independently.

·       Willingness to follow office procedures and norms.

·       Willingness and ability to work extra and unpredictable hours as needed.

 

Minimum Qualifications:

 

·       A law degree (J.D.) from an accredited law school, admission to the North Carolina Bar, at least seven (7) years of progressive legal experience, and experience working on legal issues related to the delivery of health or mental health services is required.

·       Litigation experience and experience providing legal advice in the areas of health, mental health, and or Medicaid is preferred.

·       Experience working in a legislative environment is preferred.

 

Application Process:

Application packet must include all of the following:

1.  A cover letter that includes reasons the candidate is interested in the position, and discussion of relevant experience.

2.  Resume.

3.  Official undergraduate transcript.

4.  Official law school transcript.

5.  Official graduate school transcript (if applicable).

6.  General Assembly Application (must be typed, no handwritten applications, see website for WORD version).

7.  List of three academic or professional references and three personal references including name, address, telephone      number and relationship to the applicant.

All of the following must be received in the North Carolina General Assembly Personnel Office by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 12, 2012.

 

Submit all items to:                            Judy Braudwell

Personnel Office

North Carolina General Assembly

Room 5 Legislative Building

16 West Jones Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

For information about the position:  Contact Walker Reagan, Research Division (919) 733-2578.

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Twin County Business & Networking Expo

Wednesday, Sept. 12th – 6pm

Edgecombe Community College, Tarboro

Twin County Democracy, our local chapter serving the Edgecombe-Nash region, is meeting this Wednesday September the 12th at 6pm at the Tarboro branch of the Edgecombe Community College in the McIntyre Building, Room A-141.  The campus is located at 2009 West Wilson Street, Tarboro, NC.

Whether you want to stock up on nonpartisan voter registration supplies, help us do voter registration and preregistration at the local high schools, help us plan a phone bank and distribution of nonpartisan voter guides next month, or just learn more about what Twin County Democracy is all about, please join us on Wednesday at 6pm!

For more information call Democracy North Carolina 919-286-6000

 

 

 

Report for Rep. Angela Bryant Halifax, Roanoke Rapids, Weldon, Nash-Rocky Mount, Edgecombe & Franklin 2011-2012 School Year High School Graduation, ABC & AYP (Complied on August 8, 2012 by Chris Faison)

Email Alert from the Office of Rep. Angela R. Bryant, NC House District 7 Proudly Representing Halifax and Nash Counties until Jan. 2013; and Nash and Franklin Counties – Jan 2013 – 2014

 

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Report for Rep. Angela Bryant

Halifax, Roanoke Rapids, Weldon, Nash-Rocky Mount, Edgecombe & Franklin

2011-2012 School Year

High School Graduation, ABC & AYP

(Complied on August 8, 2012 by Chris Faison)

 

Note: All data is for the 2011-12 School Year. The dropout rate will be made available in February 2013.

*Highlights of the ABCs Program for the 2011-12 School Year.

            For the 2011-12 School Year, 2,482 public schools in North Carolina were assigned an ABC status. 18 schools were special education, vocational/career schools, or hospital schools. 28 schools had insufficient data and 3 schools violated the 95% participation rule (total schools 2,531). The Annual Measureable Objectives (AMOs) are presented for 2,520 of the state’s schools. 1,165 schools (46.2%) met all AMOs, while 1,355 schools (53.8%) did not meet all AMOs. Among the 1,083 Title I schools, 415 (38.3%) met all AMOs.

 

Halifax, Roanoke Rapids & Weldon Summary

ü  The 4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate Report (2008-09 Entering 9th Graders Graduating in 2011-12 or Earlier) had Halifax with a 75.5.% rate (10-11: 71.5%), Roanoke Rapids with a 80.0% rate (10-11: 75.4%) & Weldon has a rate of 85.3% (10-11: 77.1%) [NC 80.2%, 10-11: 77.7%]

ü  Halifax had 0 of 11 schools meet all AMO targets (0%). In 10-11: 0 of 11 (0%) made AYP (remained constant from AYP to AMO).

ü  Roanoke Rapids had 1 of 4 schools meet all AMO targets (0%). In 10-11: 0 of 4 (0%) made AYP (increased by 25%, 1 more school made AMO).  

ü  Weldon had 2 of 4 schools meet all AMO targets (50%). In 10-11: 1 of 4 (25%) made AYP (increased by 25%, 1 more school made AMO).

 

Nash-Rocky Mount (N-RM), Edgecombe & Franklin Summary 

ü  The 4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate Report (2008-09 Entering 9th Graders Graduating in 2011-12 or Earlier) had N-RM with a 76.7% rate (10-11: 74.7%), [NC 80.2%, 10-11: 77.7%]

ü  N-RM has 9 of 27 schools meet all AMO targets (33.3%).In 10-11: 4 of 27 (14.8%) made AYP (increased by 18.5%, 5 more schools made AMO).

ü  Edgecombe has 5 of 15 schools meet all AMO targets (33.3%).In 10-11: 2 of 15 (13.3%) made AYP (increased by 20%, 3 more schools made AMO).

ü  Franklin has 8 of 15 schools meet all AMO targets (53.3%).In 10-11: 4 of 15 (26.7%) made AYP (increased by 26.6%, 4 more schools made AMO).

 

2011-2012 4-Year Cohort Graduation Rates by LEA (School District)

LEA/School Name

Denominator

(students starting out)

Numerator

(students who graduated)

Percent

% Change from 2011

*Halifax County Schools

335

253

75.5

+4.0 %

Northwest HS

188

139

73.9

+0.8 %

Southeast Halifax HS

146

114

78.1

+6.6 %

*Roanoke Rapids City Schools

210

168

80.0

+4.6 %

Roanoke Rapids HS

210

168

80.0

+4.6 %

*Weldon City Schools

75

64

85.3

+8.2 %

Weldon STEM HS

75

64

85.3

+8.2 %

*North Carolina

111101

89126

80.2

+2.5 %

 

2011-2012 4-Year Cohort Graduation Rates by LEA (School District)

LEA/School Name

Denominator

(students starting out)

Numerator

(students who graduated)

Percent

% Change from 2011

*Nash-Rocky Mount Schools

1324

1016

76.7

+2.0 %

W L Greene Alternative

12

6

50.0

no change

Nash Central HS

312

232

70.4

+5.1 %

N-RMS Early College HS

47

>95

slight increase

Northern Nash HS

331

270

81.6

+1.1 %

Rocky Mount HS

302

233

77.8

-0.6 %

Southern Nash HS

296

235

79.4

-0.1 %

*Edgecombe County Schools

540

431

79.8

+4.8%

Edgecombe Early College HS

30

>95

no change

North Edgecombe HS

94

86

91.5

+16.8

SouthWest Edgecombe HS

224

168

75.0

+3.4

Tarboro HS

179

147

82.1

-1.9%

*Franklin County Schools

674

540

80.1

+1.2%

Bunn HS

237

195

82.3

+3.8%

Franklinton HS

245

204

83.3

+5.4%

Louisburg HS

188

141

75.0

-6.5%

*North Carolina

111101

89126

80.2

  +3.5 %

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Halifax County Schools

School Code & School

Grade Span

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

304 Aurelian Springs ES

PK-5

Yes

No

55.1

316 Dawson ES

PK-5

No

No

39.5

324 Enfield MS

6-8

Yes

No

42.6

328 Everetts ES

PK-5

No

No

45.8

336 Hollister ES

PK-5

No

No

51.0

340 Inborden ES

PK-5

No

No

29.6

346 Northwest HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

60.0

348 Pittman ES

PK-5

No

No

54.3

356 Scotland Neck Primary  

PK-3

No

No

50.0

358 SE Halifax HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

68.9

376 William R Davie MS

6-8

Yes

Yes

43.6

ABCs Status: HE-Honor Schools of Excellence; Exp-Expected Growth; Hgh-High Growth; Exc-School of Excellence; Dst-School of Distinction; Pro-School of Progress; Pri-Priorty School, MI-25 Most Improved K-8 Schools or 10 Most Improved High Schools; LP-Low Performing; NR-No Recognition; 95R-Less than 95% tested; AYP: Adequate Yearly Progress (No Child Left Behind Measure)

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Roanoke Rapids City Schools

School Code & School

Grade

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

ABCs Status

Met All AMO Targets

304 Belmont ES

PK-5

No

No

65.3

NR

No

306 Chaloner MS

6-8

Yes

No

77.6

Pro Exp

No

316 Roanoke Rapids HS

9-12

Yes

No

77.4

Pro Exp

Yes

328 WL Mann ES

PK-5

Yes

Yes

76.8

Pro Hgh

No

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Weldon City Schools

School Code & School

Grade

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

ABCs Status

Met All AMO Targets

310 Roanoke Valley EC

8-13

Yes

No

87.6

Dst Exp

Yes

314 Weldon ES

PK-4

No

No

50.0

Pri

No

318 Weldon MS

5-8

Yes

No

54.6

Pri Exp

No

700 Weldon STEM HS

9-12

Yes

No

73.8

Pro Exp

Yes

 

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Nash-Rocky Mount Schools

School Code & School

Grade

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

ABCs Status

Met All AMO Targets

304 Bailey ES

PK-5

Yes

No

79.9

Pro Exp

No

306 Bakersville ES

K-5

Yes

Yes

79.2

Pro Hgh

Yes

308 Benvenue ES

K-5

No

No

71.9

NR

No

316 Cedar Grove ES

PK-5

Yes

No

77.5

Pro Exp

Yes

320 Nash Central MS

6-8

No

No

65.5

NR

No

324 Coopers ES

PK-5

Yes

No

80.3

Dst Exp

Yes

326 D S Johnson ES

K-5

No

No

53.2

Pri

No

328 Englewood ES

3-5

Yes

No

67.8

Pro Exp

No

329 G R Edwards MS

6-8

Yes

No

60.7

Pro Exp

No

332 M B Hubbard ES

K-5

Yes

No

63.8

Pro Exp

No

334 J W Parker MS

6-8

No

No

65.9

NR

No

336 Middlesex ES

PK-5

No

No

68.7

NR

No

340 W L Greene Alter

6-12

Yes

No

21.8

Exp

No

346 Nash Central HS

9-12

No

No

68.4

NR

No

347 NRM Ear Col HS

9-13

Yes

Yes

89.8

Dst Hgh

Yes

348 Nashville ES

PK-5

Yes

No

87.6

Dst Exp

Yes

350 Northern Nash HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

74.8

Pro Hgh

Yes

354 O R Pope ES

K-5

Yes

No

57.7

Pri Exp

Yes

358 Red Oak MS

6-8

Yes

No

80.4

Dst Exp

No

360 Red Oak ES

K-2

No

No

No EOGs

NR

Yes

361 Rocky Mount HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

67.5

Pro Exp

No

362 So Nash MS

6-8

Yes

No

77.9

Pro Exp

No

364 South Nash HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

77.9

Pro Hgh

No

376 Sprng Hope ES

K-5

No

No

64.8

NR

No

384 Swift Creek ES

PK-5

No

No

79.5

NR

Yes

 

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Edgecombe County Schools

School Code & School

Grade Span

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

ABCs Status

Met All AMO Targets

304 GW Bulluck ES

PK-5

Yes

No

66.7

Pro Exp

No

308 G W Carver ES

PK-5

No

No

65.2

NR

No

310 Roberson Ctr for Ed Ac

6-12

No

No

22.7

NR

Yes

312 Coker-Wimberly ES

PK-5

No

No

50.4

Pri

No

324 CB Martin MS

7-8

Yes

No

53.4

Pri Exp

No

326 Edgecombe ECHS

9-13

Yes

Yes

92.0

HE Hgh

Yes

328 North Edgecombe HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

67.6

Pro Hgh

Yes

330 W A Pattillo A+ ES

4-6

No

No

50.9

Pri

No

332 Phillips MS

6-8

Yes

No

47.0

Pri Exp

No

334 Princeville Montessori

PK-5

No

No

50.0

Pri

No

340 South Edgecombe MS

6-8

Yes

No

64.8

Pro Exp

No

348 West Edgecombe MS

6-8

No

No

58.1

Pri

No

350 SW Edgecombe HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

60.9

Pro Hgh

No

354 Stocks ES

PK-3

No

No

69.2

NR

Yes

358 Tarboro HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

71.0

Pro Hgh

Yes

 

The ABCs of Public Education

2011-12 Growth & Performance of North Carolina Public Schools

Franklin County Schools

School Code & School

Grade Span

Met Expected

Met High

Performance Composite

ABCs Status

Met All AMO Targets

304 Bunn ES

K-5

Yes

No

79.0

Pro Exp

Yes

308 Bunn HS

9-12

No

No

86.7

NR

No

310 Bunn MS

6-8

Yes

No

80.8

Dst Exp

Yes

312 Cedar Creek MS

6-8

Yes

Yes

78.3

Pro Hgh

Yes

316 Edward Best ES

K-5

Yes

Yes

82.2

Dst Hgh

Yes

317 Franklin Co ECHS

9-13

No

No

83.5

NR

No

318 Franklinton ES

K-5

Yes

No

68.9

Pro Exp

No

321 Franklinton HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

84.0

Dst Hgh

Yes

330 Laurel Mill ES

PK-5

No

No

69.4

NR

No

331 Long Mill ES

PK-5

Yes

Yes

80.0

Dst Hgh

Yes

332 Louisburg ES

Pk-5

Yes

No

70.1

Pro Exp

No

336 Louisburg HS

9-12

Yes

Yes

76.5

Pro Hgh

Yes

338 Terrell Lane MS

6-8

Yes

No

69.9

Pro Exp

No

339 Royal ES

PK-5

Yes

No

75.9

Pro Exp

No

340 Youngsville ES

K-5

Yes

Yes

86.0

Dst Hgh

Yes

2011-2012 LEA AMO Summary

 

LEA: 420 Halifax County Schools

 

School: 304 Aurelian Springs Elementary
School met 14 (or 82.4%) out of 17 target goals

 

School: 316 Dawson Elementary
School met 10 (or 76.9%) out of 13 target goals

School: 324 Enfield Middle
School met 10 (or 58.8%) out of 17 target goals

School: 328 Everetts Elementary
School met 10 (or 76.9%) out of 13 target goals

School: 336 Hollister Elementary
School met 11 (or 64.7%) out of 17 target goals

School: 340 Inborden Elementary
School met 10 (or 76.9%) out of 13 target goals

 

0 school(s) (or 0%) of 11 met all AMO target

School: 346 Northwest High
School met 11 (or 73.3%) out of 15 target goals

School: 348 Pittman Elementary
School met 10 (or 76.9%) out of 13 target goals

School: 356 Scotland Neck Primary
School met 1 (or 50.0%) out of 2 target goals

School: 358 Southeast Halifax High
School met 12 (or 80.0%) out of 15 target goals

School: 376 William R Davie Middle
School met 14 (or 82.4%) out of 17 target goals

 

 

2011-2012 LEA AMO Summary

LEA: 421 Roanoke Rapids City Schools

 

School: 304 Belmont Elementary
School met 11 (or 52.4%) out of 21 target goals

 

School: 306 Chaloner Middle
School met 17 (or 81.0%) out of 21 target goals

 

1 school(s) (or 25.0%) of 4 met all AMO target

 

School: 316 Roanoke Rapids High
School met 16 (or 100.0%) out of 16 target goals

School: 328 William L Manning Elementary
School met 20 (or 95.2%) out of 21 target goals

 

 

 

2011-12 LEA AMO Summary

 

LEA: 422 Weldon City Schools

 

School: 310 Roanoke Valley Early College
School met 13 (or 100.0%) out of 13 target goals

School: 314 Weldon Elementary
School met 7 (or 53.8%) out of 13 target goals

 

 

2 school(s) (or 50.0%) of 4 met all AMO target

School: 318 Weldon Middle
School met 7 (or 53.8%) out of 13 target goals

School: 700 Weldon STEM High
School met 9 (or 100.0%) out of 9 target goals

 

 

2011-12 LEA AMO Summary

LEA: 640 Nash-Rocky Mount Schools

 

School: 304 Bailey Elementary
School met 28 (or 96.6%) out of 29 target goals

School: 306 Baskerville Elementary
School met 13 (or 100.0%) out of 13 target goals

School: 308 Benvenue Elementary
School met 18 (or 85.7%) out of 21 target goals

School: 316 Cedar Grove Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals

School: 320 Nash Central Middle
School met 13 (or 61.9%) out of 21 target goals

School: 324 Coopers Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals

School: 340 W L Greene Alternative
School met 2 (or 28.6%) out of 7 target goals

School: 346 Nash Central High
School met 17 (or 85.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 347 NRM Early College High School
School met 5 (or 100.0%) out of 5 target goals

School: 348 Nashville Elementary
School met 21 (or 100.0%) out of 21 target goals

School: 350 Northern Nash High
School met 20 (or 100.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 354 O R Pope Elementary
School met 13 (or 100.0%) out of 13 target goals

School: 358 Red Oak Middle
School met 27 (or 93.1%) out of 29 target goals

School: 360 Red Oak Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals
School is a K-2 Feeder School

9 School(s) (or 33.3%) out of 27 met all AMO targets

School: 326 D S Johnson Elementary
School met 10 (or 76.9%) out of 13 target goals

School: 328 Englewood Elementary
School met 16 (or 76.2%) out of 21 target goals

School: 329 G R Edwards Middle
School met 14 (or 66.7%) out of 21 target goals

School: 332 M B Hubbard Elementary
School met 15 (or 88.2%) out of 17 target goals

School: 334 J W Parker Middle
School met 19 (or 90.5%) out of 21 target goals

School: 336 Middlesex Elementary
School met 15 (or 71.4%) out of 21 target goals

School: 361 Rocky Mount High
School met 19 (or 95.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 362 Southern Nash Middle
School met 26 (or 89.7%) out of 29 target goals

School: 364 Southern Nash High
School met 25 (or 96.2%) out of 26 target goals

School: 376 Spring Hope Elementary
School met 13 (or 61.9%) out of 21 target goals

School: 384 Swift Creek Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals

School: 396 Williford Elementary
School met 7 (or 53.8%) out of 13 target goals

School: 400 Winstead Avenue Elementary
School met 16 (or 76.2%) out of 21 target goals
School is a K-2 Feeder School

 

 

2011-12 LEA AMO Summary

LEA: 330 Edgecombe County Public School

 

School: 304 G W Bulluck Elementary
School met 14 (or 82.4%) out of 17 target goals

School: 308 G W Carver Elementary
School met 14 (or 73.7%) out of 19 target goals

School: 310 Roberson Cntr for Ed Achieveme
School met 2 (or 100.0%) out of 2 target goals

School: 312 Coker-Wimberly Elementary
School met 9 (or 60.0%) out of 15 target goals

School: 332 Phillips Middle
School met 7 (or 53.8%) out of 13 target goals

School: 334 Princeville Montessori
School met 7 (or 53.8%) out of 13 target goals

School: 340 South Edgecombe Middle
School met 10 (or 58.8%) out of 17 target goals

School: 348 West Edgecombe Middle
School met 14 (or 66.7%) out of 21 target goals

 

5 School(s) (or 33.3%) out of 15 met all AMO targets

School: 324 C B Martin Middle
School met 9 (or 52.9%) out of 17 target goals

School: 326 Edgecombe Early College High
School met 5 (or 100.0%) out of 5 target goals

School: 328 North Edgecombe High
School met 15 (or 100.0%) out of 15 target goals

School: 330 W A Pattillo A+ Elementary Sch
School met 14 (or 56.0%) out of 25 target goals

School: 350 SouthWest Edgecombe High
School met 14 (or 70.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 354 Stocks Elementary
School met 15 (or 100.0%) out of 15 target goals

School: 358 Tarboro High
School met 20 (or 100.0%) out of 20 target goals

 

 

2011-12 LEA AMO Summary

LEA: 350 Franklin County Schools

 

School: 304 Bunn Elementary
School met 23 (or 100.0%) out of 23 target goals

School: 308 Bunn High
School met 15 (or 75.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 310 Bunn Middle
School met 25 (or 100.0%) out of 25 target goals

School: 312 Cedar Creek Middle
School met 25 (or 100.0%) out of 25 target goals

School: 316 Edward Best Elementary
School met 21 (or 100.0%) out of 21 target goals

School: 317 Franklin County Early College
School met 1 (or 50.0%) out of 2 target goals

School: 318 Franklinton Elementary
School met 13 (or 76.5%) out of 17 target goals

School: 321 Franklinton High
School met 20 (or 100.0%) out of 20 target goals

 

8 School(s) (or 53.3%) out of 15 met all AMO targets

School: 330 Laurel Mill Elementary
School met 12 (or 80.0%) out of 15 target goals

School: 331 Long Mill Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals

School: 332 Louisburg Elementary
School met 18 (or 85.7%) out of 21 target goals

School: 336 Louisburg High
School met 20 (or 100.0%) out of 20 target goals

School: 338 Terrell Lane Middle
School met 20 (or 80.0%) out of 25 target goals

School: 339 Royal Elementary
School met 19 (or 90.5%) out of 21 target goals

School: 340 Youngsville Elementary
School met 17 (or 100.0%) out of 17 target goals

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter from the Office of Rep. Angela Bryant

 

 

clip_image002

NORTH CAROLINA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

 

Representative Angela R. Bryant

House of Representatives

 

Proudly Representing District 7 – Nash and Halifax Counties until Jan. 2013; District 7 – Nash and Franklin Counties for 2013-14 Session

clip_image004

 

 

Volume IV, Issue 9

                                                      July 11, 2012

 

 

 

NEWS FROM RALEIGH…

 

I always welcome your comments, project updates, suggestions, and visits. My office door and electronic door is always open to you!  As always, thank you for your support! 

 

REP. BRYANT REPRESENTING DISTRICT 7 – NASH AND HALIFAX COUNTY UNTIL JAN. 2013; DISTRICT 7 – NASH AND FRANKLIN COUNTIES

FOR 2013-14 SESSION

 

Representative Bryant will be representing Halifax county until Jan. 2013, the end of this term, while at the same time, making new relationships in Franklin/Nash counties.

 

 

Raise the Age NC at the General Assembly

 

 

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Representative Angela Bryant with supporters of Raise the Age NC, who came to the General Assembly to lobby on May 15th. Pictured with: Commissioner Linda Virgil of Sharpsburg (second from left), local activist Jim Grant (far right) and other Nash county supporters.

Raise the Age is a growing bipartisan movement to protect our communities, our kids and our wallets. Currently, North Carolina is one of only two states in the nation that prosecute all 16- and 17-year-olds charged with a crime in the adult criminal justice system, regardless of the severity of  their alleged crimes. The Raise the Age coalition includes legislators, noteworthy judges and law enforcement officials, children’s advocates, church leaders, business leaders, doctors, educators and concerned North Carolinians across the state who’ve worked tirelessly to pass legislation that will Raise the Age of juvenile jurisdiction, save taxpayers millions of dollars and give our kids a better shot at leading productive lives.

Following unanimous support of a House Judiciary Committee, a bipartisan bill to Raise the Age of juvenile jurisdiction (S434) and even the playing field for North Carolina’s youth will move to a research committee to review the steps necessary to fully implement the policy change. This committee will formally take up juvenile justice reform in the coming weeks.

 

(SOURCE: Raise the Age NC)

 

 

 

AROUND THE DISTRICT & MORE

·       Freedom School Summer Camp, Peacemakers Family Community Center, 1725 Davis Street, Rocky Mount, Mon. June 18 –Friday, July 27 from 8am – 3pm.  Transportation is available on an as needed basis.  For more information contact Cheri L. Pullen at 252-314-5616.  Application deadline is May 15, 2012. Also visit the website at: http://www.childrensdefense.org/programs-campaigns/freedom-schools/

·       Summer Music Camps, The Music School of Roanoke Rapids, 1100 Roanoke Avenue. Dates: June 18-22; June 25-29; July 9-13; July 16-20; July 23-27. For more information call (252)678-4954 or visit www.themusicschoolofroanokerapids.com.

·        The Annual Festival, Franklinton Center Day at Bricks (Just North of Rocky Mount), Franklinton Center, 281 Bricks Lane, Whitakers, NC 27891. August 4, 2012, 9:00am-5:00pm.

·       Nash & Surrounding Counties Prison Re-Entry Roundtable, All are welcome to the city-wide roundtable discussion. 820 Nashville Road, Rocky Mount, NC 27803. August 6, 2012, 5:30pm- 8:00pm. For more information, contact Lois Watkins at (252)442-2925 or lois@ncbtg.org.

·       North Carolina Health Professions Diversity Conference, Grandover Hotel and Conference Center, One Thousand Club Road, Greensboro, North Carolina 27407. August 29-30, 2012. The theme of this year’s conference is “Showcasing Success – Creating Equity in Opportunity.” This two-day conference will focus on showcasing models and strategies that have proven successful in recruiting and retaining students in health professional programs as well as maintaining a diverse workforce setting. It will also focus on creating networks, partnerships and collaborations with others around the state of North Carolina that share the same interests in creating equity in opportunity in the health workforce. For more information, contact Gabriela Staley at (704)512-6596 or visit http://www.charlotteahec.org/continuing_education/registration/workshop.cfm?EventID=36402.

·        Auditioning and Production dates for Play, the Nash Arts and The Imperial Center are partnering to mount a full production of a play, You Wouldn’t Expect.  This play presents the stories of four of the almost 8,000 victims of the North Carolina sterilization program.  Performance dates will be September 28, 29, October 5, 6, 7–with the final matinee presentation at the historic Booker T Theater in downtown Rocky Mount.  Audition dates are August 2nd, 3rd with call backs on the 4th at Nash Arts (http://www.nasharts.org/) in Nashville beginning at 7:00 p.m. For more information contact Marilynn Barner Anselmi at (252)446-2585 or email to marilynn_anselmi@ncsu.edu.

·        Healthy Food Financing Forum North Carolina Grown: Moving Healthy Food from the Farm to the Kitchen, hosted by the Support Center and Strategic Partners, Joseph S. Koury Convention Center, 3121 High Point Road at I-40, Greensboro, NC 27407. Tuesday, October 9, 9:00am -3:30pm.

·        Voices from The Valley: Patient-Provider Communication Along the Breast Cancer Continuum in Northeastern North Carolina, The Centre at Halifax Community College, 100 College Drive, Weldon, NC 27890. Saturday, November 3, 8:00am-3:00pm. For more information, visit http://www.gbdf.org/ccwelcome.html or call Angela Carter at (252)535-8623.

 

 

CONGRATULATIONS ARE IN ORDER…

Roanoke Rapids and Rocky Mount two out of 219 Community Health Centers to Receive Grants

On Wednesday, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced awards of new federal grants made possible by the health care law to expand community health centers. The grants which were awarded to 219 health centers will help expand access to care for more than 1.25 million additional patients and create approximately 5,640 jobs. Since the beginning of 2009, health centers have added more than 25,300 new full-time positions.  The awards announced will infuse critical dollars into health centers and their surrounding communities, enhancing health centers’ ability to serve more patients and creating thousands of jobs across the country.

 

  • Rural Health Group, Inc. in Roanoke Rapids, NC received $225,000.
  • Opportunities Industrialization, Inc. of Rocky Mount, NC received $650,000.

 

 

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DID YOU KNOW?

 

Young Women Can Enter $3,000 Scholarship Essay Contest

 

The National Foundation for Women Legislators (NFWL) and the National Rifle Association (NRA) are co-sponsoring the 15th Annual Bill of Rights Essay Scholarship Contest for college-bound female high school juniors and seniors.  This year’s topic discusses the impact public policies have on women and historically underrepresented populations as they are decided at the state versus federal level.  The contest’s seven winners will each receive a $3,000 college scholarship and an all-expenses-paid trip to NFWL’s Annual Conference November 15-19, 2012 at The Ritz-Carlton in Atlanta, Georgia, where they will network with, be mentored by, and speak to hundreds of women lawmakers from across the United States.

 

To learn more about this scholarship opportunity, please visit: http://www.womenlegislators.org/events/scholarship-program.php or feel free to contact (202)293-3040 ext. 1005, or by email at events@womenlegislators.org

 

Entries must be received or postmarked no later than July 31st, 2012, after which an NFWL selection committee will judge each essay and determine the seven winners.  The judges will primarily weigh the factors of research, understanding of the Bill of Rights, original insight, and personal connection.

 

I-95 Economic Assessment Advisory Council Contact Information

External Stakeholders

 

 

 

 

Name

Agency

Title

Email Address

Phone

Rolf Blizzard

NC Travel & Tourism Coalition

Chairman

rblizzard1@me.com

(919) 833-8380

Jake Cashion

NC Chamber

Director of Governmental Affairs

jcashion@ncchamber.net

(919) 836-1411

Crystal Collins

NC Trucking Association

President

ccollins@nctrucking.com

(919) 281-2746

Andy Ellen

NC Retail Merchants Association

General Counsel

andye@ncrma.org

(919) 832-0811

Lynn Lewis

NC Travel Industry Association                         (Washington Tourism Development Authority)

Executive Director

lynn@originalwashington.com

(252) 948-9415

Mike Walden

NC State University – Agricultural & Resource Economics

Distinguished Professor

walden@ncsu.edu

(919) 515-4671

Larry Wooten

NC Farm Bureau

President

larry.wooten@ncfb.org

(919) 782-1705

Scott Aman

NC Petroleum & Convenience Marketers

Treasurer

scottaman@newdixieoil.com

 

Intergovernmental Team

 

Name

Agency

Title

Email Address

Phone

Victor Barbour

NCDOT

Administrator, Technical Services Division

vbarbour@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2900

Greer Beaty

NCDOT

Director of Communications

gbeaty@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2665

Roberto Canales

NCDOT

Coordinator of Strategic Initiatives

rcanales@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2800

Susan Coward

NCDOT

Deputy Secretary of Intergovernmental Affairs & Budget Coordination

scoward@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2800

Bobby Lewis

NCDOT

Chief of Staff

bobbylewis@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2800

Beau Memory

NCDOT

Legislative Liaison

bmemory@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2800

Kristine O’Connor

NCDOT

I-95 Project Manager

kaoconnor@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-6034

Jim Trogdon

NCDOT

Chief Operating Officer

jtrogdon@ncdot.gov

(919) 707-2800

Stephanie McGarrah

NC Department of Commerce

Assistant Secretary – Policy Research & Strategic Planning

smcgarrah@nccommerce.com

(919) 733-3454

John Sullivan

FHWA

Division Administratior

John.Sullivan@fhwa.dot.gov

(919) 856-4346

 

LEGISLATIVE RECAP

HB 572. ACCOUNTABILITY FOR PUBLICLY FUNDED NONPROFITS. Filed 3/30/11. TO PROVIDE GREATER ACCOUNTABILITY FOR NONPROFIT ENTITIES THAT RECEIVE PUBLIC FUNDING.

  • Provides that a corporation that receives over $5,000 of public funding within a fiscal year has to provide its latest annual financial statements upon written demand from any member of the public.
  • A corporation also has to provide a copy of its most recently completed and filed Internal Revenue Service Form 990 or Form 990-EZ or a copy of the message confirming the corporation’s submission of Internal Revenue Service Form 990-N.
  • A corporation can comply by maintaining these documents on its public website or on a website established and maintained by another entity (as long as the entity does not charge a fee or require website registration to access the information).

(Status: Ratified 7/02/2012)

 

HB 1173. Absconding Prob. Violators Forfeit Benefits. Filed 5/29/12. TO PROVIDE THAT A PROBATION VIOLATOR WHO ABSCONDS OR OTHERWISE WILLFULLY AVOIDS ARREST AFTER THE ISSUANCE OF A WARRANT SHALL FORFEIT ANY PUBLIC ASSISTANCE BENEFITS UNTIL SURRENDERING TO THE COURT.

·       Such benefits include: unemployment benefits, Medicaid or other medical assistance benefits, Work First Family Assistance, food and nutrition benefits, and any other financial assistance of any kind being paid to the probationer from State or federal funds.

·       This will not affect the eligibility for any public benefits that are being received by or for the benefit of a family member of a probation violator.

(Status: Ratified 7/02/2012)

 

 

Bills Intended to Make Voting Harder Are Dead – At Least Until the next General Assembly begins meeting in 2013

The legislature failed to override Gov. Bev Perdue’s veto of the bill to require a government photo ID before voting! And several other voter suppression measures did not pass – including bills to cut a week off Early Voting, ban Sunday voting, repeal Same-Day Registration, end straight-ticket voting, add new restriction for groups doing voter registration, and eliminate pre-registration for teenagers. These bills failed because of your countless calls and emails, your showing up for marches and rallies, your personal visits with legislators, and the many other actions taken by Advocates like you.

Unfortunately, there was no success in freeing up the $4 million in federal funds from the Help American Vote Act. After significant steps forward, top leaders of the General Assembly reversed course, dug in their heels and refused to release the funds for the upcoming election.

It does make a difference who gets elected to public office!

(SOURCE: Democracy NC)

Criminal Justice Legislative Update

 

The legislature adjourned last week after another session of budget cutting and veto overrides on important legislation such as the Racial Justice Act and the budget.

 

While we are all enduring a struggling economy, the 2012-2013 budget didn’t have to be this bad. If the legislature had held off on the business tax which gives a break to every company making over $100,000, or extended the 3/4 cent sales tax, more funds would be available to sustain critical public investments. 

 

Amidst the overwhelming news of damaging cuts, veto overrides, the consolidations and reorganizations that have marked this General Assembly, there were a few positive developments.   Pre-Trial Services supporters managed to keep a bill from enactment that was designed to severely limit pretrial options.  A bill allowing expunction for non-violent felonies was passed and – after a positive US Supreme Court ruling – options for parole were increased for juveniles facing life sentences.   Although the bill to Raise the Juvenile Age was not successful, it was – at long last – favorably reported out of a House committee.  We will report further on these substantive issues in a future Update; this issue will focus on the 2012-2013 budget.

    

Justice and Public Safety Budget

The final budget providing funds to Justice and Public Safety agencies and community based corrections programs has suffered major cuts. 

 

The final Justice and Public Safety budget is $42.9 mil LESS than the Gov’s budget and $20.7 million LESS than the proposed House budget. These budget cuts come on top of 4 solid years of budget cuts.  Agencies and communities are struggling to make do with less every single year. 

 

Corrections, courts and public safety agencies continue to limp along. Community programs that work at the local level to keep communities safe are no longer limping; they now have two broken legs after 4 years of budget cuts, reductions and eliminations.

    

Management Flexibility Reserve: The final budget relied on heavily on Management Flexibility Reserve – funds that come from lapsed salaries – to make over $30 million in cuts without specifying where the cuts would come from.   

 

Some cuts from Man Flex reserve make sense because dollars in lapsed salaries inevitably come open in every agency.  The problem with this approach is that it gives agencies more authority to make cuts in areas not reviewed and approved by the legislature.   If there are not sufficient savings from lapsed salaries, the  management flexibility reserve can become a path for agencies to make further cuts in unintended places.

 

Salaries: The final budget includes a 1.2% pay raise for state employees.  That is a pittance in any year, but certainly so after 4 years without a pay raise.

 

Department of Public Safety

The newly formed Department is reeling from the merger of Corrections, Juvenile Justice and Crime Control and Public Safety.  The merger has brought little in the way of savings and much in the way of organizational chaos.  These three agencies are now wrestling with how to best provide services as one mega- department.

 

Justice Reinvestment: There are numerous problems with Justice Reinvestment getting off the ground. Virtually everything is taking longer than initially expected and funds have not been reinvested as anticipated. The Justice Reinvestment Act has added post-release supervision to an additional 14,000 people with the stated goal of providing both supervision and additional treatment opportunities. Unfortunately, the 2012-2013 budget doesn’t provide reinvested funds for either goal.

 

We have long supported a reinvestment of funds in the Justice system.  At this point, though, a REAL reinvestment is needed to reduce recidivism.   That investment has not been made. Financial savings cannot be realized without reductions in recidivism.  We’d like to see the reality on the ground match the rhetoric in the air.

 

TECS/ CJPP: The final budget cuts TECS (Treatment for Effective Community Supervision) by $5 million and replaces it with $5 million from the Misdemeanor Confinement fund.  While the funds are available in the Misdemeanor Confinement fund, it is unfortunate to begin TECS- a lynchpin in Justice Reinvestment – with the Department of Public Safety raising questions about the stability of the funding. 

 

The TECS program has not issued contracts yet and is not expected to begin taking clients in many areas until October. The administration has reduced funds allocated for substance abuse services  and has applied them to another evidence-based program – Cognitive Behavioral Interventions (CBI). While CBI is a good program, serious concerns remain about the reductions in available substance abuse treatment dollars across the budget.

      

The funds (approximately $9 million) that were used in the Criminal Justice Partnership Program for approximately 7,000 individuals will now be spread across a greater number of probationers.  In addition, these services are said to be available to some of the 14,000 individuals coming out on post-release supervision.  These funds were not sufficient to start with and definitely won’t be enough to help reduce recidivism for a greatly increased population. 

 

Post-Release Supervision: To complicate matters further, no funds have been included for post-release supervision officers and only a portion of what’s needed for the parole commission ($169,000) has been funded.  The Governor had requested $12.2 million for these purposes.  The final budget contemplates a reassignment of vacant positions although some of the dollars are likely needed for other unanticipated expenses, not to mention the need to fill the actual vacant positions for their original purposes.

 

Prisons Closed/ Dollars Not Reinvested:In 2011, the legislature could have immediately redirected dollars saved from the closing of 4 prisons into Justice Reinvestment needs. That wasn’t done. The Department of Public Safety now requires NEW dollars – rather than reinvested dollars – to fund officers for post-release supervision.  Those dollars are not in the budget.

 

90 Day Revocations: The 90 day revocations and the “quick dips” – have still not started. 

  

Misdemeanant Confinement Fund: The misdemeanant confinement fund is distributing misdemeanant offenders into open jail beds across the state, but it does nothing to address any underlying treatment issues or needs with this group. It is an incarceration only program and is managed by the Sherriff’s Association.  In addition, a lawsuit is underway which could undermine approximately $11 million in fees that comprise a major chunk of the funding for this program.

 

Department of Public Safety – Juvenile Justice

     There is a $1.6 management flexibility reserve Juvenile Justice that could have an impact on other items as the fiscal year progresses.  

 

Juvenile Crime Prevention Councils (JCPCs): These have been maintained without a cut.

 

Bridge Program: This Western NC program that trains court-involved youth to fight fires has been eliminated from the Justice and Public Safety budget. Fortunately, it has been preserved by a transfer to the Department of Agriculture where staffers appear to value this highly regarded program.

 

Youth Development Centers: The final budget eliminates $1.7 million in funding for the newly constructed Edgecombe Youth Development Center. We would prefer to see a cut taken from the antiquated Dobbs facility. This cut also represents a movement away from the treatment model under which Juvenile Justice has been operating.

 

 Indigent Defense

      There are no changes in the final budget for Indigent Defense Services.  Unfortunately, IDS is wrestling with budget problems with serious budget problems. IDS runs out of money at approximately the end of the 3rd quarter and can’t pay anyone until funds are appropriated again in June.  This inadequate payment system comes on top of cuts in hourly rates that have many attorneys talking about throwing in the towel all together when it comes to representing indigent defendants.    

 

Judicial

      The Administrative Office of the Courts was cut by $5 million in management flexibility reserve.   That cut could possibly be imposed on other unspecified items as the year progresses. 

 

Clerks and the Conference of District Attorneys: these conferences were not cut by 10% in the final budget as they had been in the House. 

 

Drug Treatment Court Treatment Dollars:  We salute the areas of the state that have found ways to continue their Drug Treatment Courts in spite of the continuing attacks on funding. After eliminating Drug Treatment Court case management staff in 2011, the final budget now completely eliminates $2,258 million in substance abuse treatment dollars for the remaining drug courts.

 

Legal Services: The final budget includes $671,250 in pass through funds to the NC state bar for Access to Civil Justice.

 

Family Courts: We are pleased to see that Family Courts are included in the final budget. 

 

Trial Court Administrators: We are pleased to see that these important court management positions are included in the final budget after a mention of possible cuts.

 

 

Justice

New Crime Lab: $ 3 million has been allocated for a new crime lab in Edneyville.

 

No New Positions for DNA: The SBI is receiving a large volume of requests for testifying about DNA results. The conference budget does NOT include 12 positions in the triad region lab to handle DNA submissions.

 

Mortgage Settlement Funds: The Governor’s budget did much more with the Mortgage settlement funds than is included in the final budget.  Funds in the Governor’s budget would have been used to increase attention to financial fraud by allocating nearly $10 million to expand prosecution of lending and financial crimes and to expand financial investigative ability. 

 

SBI Training: No increases have been included for SBI training and certification even though it was recently reported that a significant number of analysts didn’t pass their certification test. The SBI continues to require careful attention after the finding of false blood spatter evidence presented by Mr. Deaver.  The documented cases of improper testimony and analysis continue to reduce public confidence in the court system.

 

MH/DD/SA and Medicaid

 Medicaid: The final budget anticipates over $59 million in savings for the care of Medicaid recipients along with another $6.6 million in pharmacy “improvements.” These savings are expected to come from improving managed care through Community Care NC. If these savings are not realized, there will be another gap in services.

 

Mental Health: Approximately $20 million was cut to the funds allocated to communities for Mental Health/ Substance Abuse/ Developmental Disabilities services at the community level. $345 million is the total amount now available and these funds support services provided to families, children, veterans and our most vulnerable citizens. These cuts compound the treatment cuts made in Drug Treatment Courts and in the Treatment for Effective Community Services program.

 

Local Management Entities (LME): The LME administrative budgets for Mental Health/ Substance Abuse and Developmental Disabilities have also been reduced by $8.4 million.

 

Managed Care Organizations: We had hoped the transition to Managed Care Organizations might have been slowed down, but that didn’t happen. The negative impact is widespread and is particularly damaging to individuals with developmental disabilities who will lose their case managers. This is a shameful loss to anyone who cares about insuring the well-being of citizens with disabilities.

 

(SOURCE: Carolina Justice Policy Center)

 

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Some Legislative Links for 2012 Short Session

Session Laws for 2011 and 2012:

http://ncleg.net/gascripts/EnactedLegislation/ELTOC.pl?sType=Law&sSessionToView=2011&sSort=sSortKey

 

scroll to bottom for most recent. This updates as the legislature processes bills from the Governor.

 

Bills on the Governor’s desk:

http://ncleg.net/gascripts/chaptered_bills/governor_pres.pl?Biennium=2011&SessionNumber=2&StartIndex=100 (59 as of 7/5)

 

 

Statutes and Session Laws affected by 2012 legislation including bills on the Governor’s desk:

http://bit.ly/Nq3qnJ

 

 

Thank You From Roanoke Rapids….

 

·       The City of Roanoke Rapids Parks and Recreation Department sent a thank you to Representative Bryant for her support of the arts in Halifax County during this Year’s session of the General Assembly. The portion of the funds awarded was used to provide musical entertainment and marketing materials for the Summer Concert Series “Fridays in the Park.”

 

·       The Roanoke Avenue Business Alliance (RABA) in Roanoke Rapids sent a thank you to Representative Bryant for her support of the North Carolina Arts Council and Halifax County Arts Council Grassroots Art Program. This program helps tackle the problem with boarded windows by calling for those windows to be covered with beautiful, historically-themed window murals.

 

 

 

HEAR AND SEE LEGISLATURE LIVE DAILY

 

You don’t have to miss the Legislative Session. WRAL will live stream legislative sessions daily on their website.     www. wral.com.  Also, please remember that you can listen to some committee meetings and press conferences on the General Assembly’s website at www.ncleg.net. Once on the site, select “Audio,” and then make your selection – House Chamber, Senate Chamber, Appropriations Committee Room or Press Conference Room.  You can also view the bills I sponsor and co-sponsor from this website address. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact:  Representative Angela R. Bryant, House of Representatives, NC House District 7

North Carolina General Assembly • 542 Legislative Office Building • 300 N. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, NC  27603 919-733-5878-Phone • 919-754-3289-FAX • Angela.Bryant@ncleg.net

or Karon Hardy, Legislative Assistant at bryantla@ncleg.net

 

 

 

See related:

Rep. Angela Bryant