School board elects new leaders – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Watch Dog response: Wow! Interesting! The voting shows there are changes going on amongst the board that used to didn’t vote together.

NASHVILLE — Ann Edge, the former vice chairwoman of the Nash-Rocky Mount Board of Education, now leads the school board.

The move came at the school board meeting on Thursday night. Each January, the Nash-Rocky Mount Board of Education elects school board leaders for the year, according to board policy. At Monday night’s meeting, school board member Wayne Doll nominated Wendy Wilson, who served as chairwoman during 2017, to serve again.

“Ms. Wilson has done an excellent job as chairman, and I feel that should continue,” Doll said.

However, school board member LaShawnda Washington proposed that Edge should become chairwoman. The matter came to a vote and Edge won the position by a vote of 7 to 4, with school board members Wayne Doll, Franklin Lamm, Ricky Jenkins and Wilson herself voting for Wilson and the other board members supporting Edge. (Rocky Mount Telegram)

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Boards argue about school construction – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Watch Dog response: Wow no comments from the racist folk who comment on everything that goes on with the Rocky Mount City Council. Oh but this involves Robbie Davis who has been outspoken against the Rocky Mount City Council.

After nearly two hours of cordial conversations about event and programs affecting the school district Thursday night, Nash County commissioners and the Nash-Rocky Mount Board of Education held a lengthy, heated discussion about the construction of the Nash-Rocky Mount Early College High School on the campus of Nash Community College.

The high school, which now meets in mobile units on the college campus, is slated to move into Building C on the college campus once the college’s new cosmetology building is completed and renovations to Building C can be accomplished. Nash County commissioners have already set aside $750,000 in funding for those renovations, Robbie Davis, chairman of the Nash County Commissioners told members of the two bodies at the joint meeting. (Rocky Mount Telegram)

Some Nash Rocky Mount schools open Monday – Rocky Mount Telegram

By Amelia Harper
Staff Writer

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Nash-Rocky Mount Public Schools and Rocky Mount Preparatory School will re-open Monday after a week of closures, but Edgecombe County Schools may not re-open for awhile as one school is flooded and another is surrounded by floodwater. “Princeville Elementary School is flooded at this point and will have to be evaluated by FEMA before we can make any decisions as to when we can get back in,” said Susan Hoke, communications coordinator for Edgecombe County Public Schools.

“In the meantime, Superintendent (John) Farrelly is working on a plan for where to send Princeville Elementary students.” Hoke also said that W.A. Patillo Middle School is surrounded by floodwater. “As far as we know, the school is not flooded, but no one can get to it right now,” Hoke said. Hoke said that no school closures for Monday had been announced, but an announcement regarding school attendance would be issued this afternoon. The situation in Edgecombe County is further complicated by the fact that both Tarboro High School and Martin Millennium Academy still are being used as Red Cross emergency shelters for displaced residents.

The shelter at Martin Millennium Academy had been closed but was reopened Wednesday to help deal with overflow from other area shelters. The missing class time may not cause as many make-up days as it would have in the past. Vanessa Jeter, communications director for the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, said schools have increased flexibility under the state’s new calendar law and should be able to deal with the additional school closure time without resorting to many make-up days. That decision is left to each school system.

“The new calendar law requires schools to meet 185 days or 1,025 hours during the academic year. Under this law, a school system could actually meet about 170 days for six hours each day and still fulfill the state requirements,” Jeter said. Jeter also said the N.C. General Assembly could have the option of waiving some of the required attendance days when it meets for its long session in January. “It is really too early for school systems to need extra days off at this point,” Jeter said. “We will have to see how the winter goes.”

Though Edgecombe County Public Schools will be closed on Monday, the school board will meet on Monday night at 6:30 at the Central Office location on Pearl Street. This meeting was rescheduled from October 10, when it originally was slated. North East Carolina Prep and Edgecombe Community College have not announced closures for Monday as of press time, though floodwaters linger through much of the area. For updated information on school closures, go to rockymounttelegram.com.

Filing opens for school board seats – Rocky Mount Telegram

Filing to run for a seat on the Nash-Rocky Mount Board of Education opens at noon today.

The filing period will run through Aug. 5.

Six seats on the board will be up for grabs during the Nov. 8 General Election.

Seats in Districts 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 11 are up for election. (Rocky Mount Telegram)

Press Release: Democratic Legislators Statement on School System Compromise

 

       
   

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North Carolina General Assembly

State Legislative Building

Raleigh, North Carolina 27601

For Immediate Release – June 15, 2016

Rep. Shelly Willingham-D-Edgecombe; Rep. Bobbie Richardson, D-Franklin; Sen. Angela Bryant, D-Nash; Sen. Erica Smith-Ingram, D-Northampton.

For more information:  Contact Rep. Shelly Willingham – 252-813-0381 or Rep. Bobbie Richardson – 919-971-0571

Nash-Edgecombe Democratic Legislators Statement on School System Compromise

On June 15, Rep. Collins in the House Rules Committee replaced Senate Bill 382, formerly a transportation bill on the ferry system, with a compromise to prevent a split of the Nash-Rocky Mount school system. After a week of deliberations, the bill will address the financial concerns of the Nash County commissioners along with a name change in 2020 and a moratorium on lawsuits by the NRMS Board.  The bill also directs the city of Rocky Mount to pay the operations gap to Nash per Edgecombe County pupil for the next four years. Edgecombe County will handle the capital gap beginning in 2016-17, and in 2020, Edgecombe County will be responsible for all costs.  In a surprise move by Collins, the bill includes a trigger provision, that would set up a process for and de-merge the NRMS if the payments are not made as scheduled. In addition, the Local Government Commission will review and certify any issues regarding failure to make payments under this new legislation.

“While we do not support the name change, lawsuit or de-merger trigger provisions, we are relieved that this compromise arrangement will preserve the Nash-Rocky Mount school system, which was our number one priority,” said N.C. Rep Bobbi Richardson, D-Franklin. “It is estimated that name change will cost over $500,000, and those funds could definitely be better used for direct educational purposes.”

In addition to the financial directives, the bill includes a moratorium to prevent a lawsuit from occurring over the next 10 years by the Nash Rocky Mount School Board against Nash County over school funding. Although a split will be averted, a school system name change, to “Nash Administrative Unit” and “Nash School Board”, omitting Rocky Mount, will occur once the city finalizes its participation in the funding.

“I am satisfied that we got the best arrangement we could get to include the financial directives that our constituents support,” acknowledges N.C. Rep. Shelly Willingham, D-Edgecombe. “Although I am not a proponent of the name change, the lawsuit and the de-merger trigger provisions, the preservation of the school system and the financial provisions approved by Edgecombe are the most significant aspects of this bill. Keeping the system intact is pivotal for the region, for economic development, and most importantly, for our students and families. We’re glad that we could work together as a local delegation to reach an agreement. Now, we can begin to concentrate on other issues.”

Senators Bryant and Smith-Ingram issued a joint statement:  “We appreciate the heavy lifting done by our house delegation members and all the citizens and civic and business leaders in both counties who worked to save the Nash Rocky Mount Schools and our belief in regional collaboration. Like our Democratic colleagues in the House, we are not supportive of all the provisions, and we worry that the de-merger trigger provisions have not been sufficiently reviewed or vetted by us, the school systems or others potentially affected; however, at least in a worst case scenario, de-merger will be handled by the local school boards. We strongly oppose the heavy-handed process that led to this compromise, and the unnecessary trigger provisions that go beyond any language acted on in any public meetings by the Commissioners.  Moving forward, we will remain vigilant to protect our constituents from “trigger-happy” truce breakers.” 

Nash County commissioners questioned the funding formula over a year ago, challenging the 1992 legislation which created the Nash-Rocky Mount school system, resulting in the dismissal of a desegregation lawsuit. Since 1992, Rocky Mount has provided the gap funding for Edgecombe County students to ensure the same amount of funding per pupil is provided for students in both counties.  Rep. Jeff Collins, D-Nash joined a majority of the Nash Commissioners in threatening to de-merge the system if their ever-changing demands were not met, and Democratic legislators fought along with the City and Edgecombe County and three of the Democratic Nash Commissioners to keep the focus solely on the financial issues and saving the system.

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Open Letter to Edgecombe County Commissioners Pertaining To Nash-Rocky Mount And Edgecombe County Public Schools De-merger

I sure hope you my Edgecombe County Commissioners do not bow down to the Nash County Commissioners as they push the Nash-Rocky Mount and Edgecombe County Public Schools split.

It is obvious that the split is being pushed by Nash County Commissioners Robbie Davis (WM) and Fred Belfield (BM). I don’t understand how Belfield has bought into Davis mess.

It will be a sad time if you allow these 2 jokers to make you all agree to their terms when it will put a burden on Edgecombe County and also what folk don’t understand it will not be good for Nash County either.

I am so glad to see the numerous letters to the editor in the Rocky Mount Telegram whereby several folk have collectively and singularly voiced their concerns against the de-merger. For me this should be enough for Edgecombe County to not agree to the de-merger under any terms.

The main thing if I am correct is Nash County Commissioners have tried to paint a picture of why the de-merger is necessary by trying to eliminate the Rocky Mount City Council from participating in the funding process. They have also made it clear they do not want them at the table. I say it is because the Rocky Mount City Council is a black majority council and many have had a problem with that when they seen it about to happen. Well the saying is if you are not at the table you are on the menu.

I am asking my Edgecombe County Commissioners to not agree to the de-merger on any terms and simply because Nash County Commissioners have not presented a real reason why it is necessary. This has nothing to do with Educating children but more about POWER!

Thanking you in advance.

See letters: Nash-Rocky Mount School Split Mess – These Letters Speak Volume

Sincerely,

Curmilus Dancy II
The Watch Dog 

 

Nash-Rocky Mount School Split Mess – These Letters Speak Volume

The whole mess about this school split is just ignant. Mess need to be put to an end! Do you see Nash County going bankrupt or for the most part struggling economically?

The problem is: Politics – I Refuse To Play It Safe Rocky Mount School Split Who Is Behind It?


Click on links to read letters you will be glad that you did.

Nash Rocky Mount Schools Split Controversy: Letter to Editor by Pastor James D. Gilliard

Letter to the Editor: Progress on school system is encouraging; press on to find solution –– As the new plant manager at Cummins here in Rocky Mount, I am deeply concerned about the future of our local school corporation. JOHN JUDD Rocky Mount

Letter to the Editor: Don’t let divisiveness over schools fester in Rocky Mount community.

Letter to the Editor: Why push for schools split against wishes of city, mayor and board?

Letter to the Editor: Commissioners should reconsider schools split plan

Letter to the Editor: Business leaders urge commissioners to reconsider school split plan

Letter to the Editor: Nash commissioners should learn the value of compromise

Letter to the Editor: City residents aren’t overburdened by funding Edgecombe schools