Princeville NC Cultural Gala Featuring The 7th Hour Grove Masters Band

Greetings,

Thank you for supporting and attending the Premiere Unveiling Event “Portraits of Humanity” on April 13, 2018, an exhibit showcasing the resilience and determination of the residents of Princeville, North Carolina.

I’m very excited to be part of the planning committee for the “Princeville Cultural Gala” on Saturday, August 25, 2018, at 7:00 p.m. at Edgecombe Community College in Tarboro, NC.

The Town of Princeville is committed to rebuilding it’s historic Town in the wake of Hurricane Matthew in 2016. 

I’d be grateful if you would support our effort to raise funds for the development of the Princeville Historic District site and to help the Town preserve the history and heritage of Princeville by becoming a sponsor.

The Town of Princeville needs your support! If you are able to donate a prize for the silent auction, please send your donation to the address in the letter attached or contact me by phone or email if you have any questions regarding the prize delivery. We would like to have all donations by Monday, August 20th

Attached, you will find a letter which details our event and how to become a sponsor and contribute to this worthy cause. Also in hopes of you attending I attached a formal invitation for you to purchase tickets and RSVP.

Please do not hesitate to contact me by email at leecee.visionist@gmail.com or by phone at 757-744-9818 if you have any questions or need additional information.

Please remember to Share, Share, Share with your network of colleagues, family, friends, and any social media platform(s) that you utilize.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Sincerely,

LeeCee Jones

Princeville Cultural Gala Sponsorship Letter

Princeville Cultural Gala Sponsorship Letter 

Formal Princeville Gala Invitation (front).png

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Storm recovery remains slow but steady – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Watch Dog response: I wonder would things have been better as it relates to the flood recovery if the Democrats were in control.

TARBORO — Recovery from Hurricane Matthew is a slow-going process but progress is being made, said Edgecombe County Manager Eric Evans.

“Even though signs of progress make us hopeful, it is still extremely difficult for those families who have not been able to move back home and are waiting on other programs to come through,” Evans said.

Ninety-nine families were approved for FEMA’s temporary direct housing program in the form of a FEMA trailer. Of those, nine have moved out into more permanent housing.

Of the nearly 400 families that were once staying in hotels under FEMA’s Transitional Shelter Assistance program, the number is down to one family that was due to move this week into a new home built by Samaritan’s Purse. (Rocky Mount Telegram)

NC asks for $900M in flood relief, feds give $6.1M, Cooper says – WRAL

The Watch Dog response: Thank you Senator for standing with our Governor. I have been saying since Matthew that folk better recognize who was in office. I told them these Republicans ain’t gonna want to do anything and if they did it would be very little. I said and the next time around if they are still in control they will not get anything.

Raleigh, N.C. — North Carolina asked the federal government for $900 million to help relieve parts of the state ravaged by Hurricane Matthew flood waters, but the government only offered $6.1 million, Gov. Roy Cooper said in a news conference on Wednesday. The $6 million of relief money is less than 1 percent of what the state asked for.

“I am deeply disappointed that Washington isn’t making North Carolina’s urgent need a top priority,” the governor said.

“Matthew did an estimated $4.8 billion in damages to 50 counties in North Carolina,” Cooper said during a news conference about the state’s preparations for hurricane season. “That’s half of our entire state.” (Read more)

Senator Smith-Ingram’s Statement on Hurricane Matthew Funding

The Watch Dog response: Thank you Senator for standing with our Governor. I have been saying since Matthew that folk better recognize who was in office. I told them these Republicans ain’t gonna want to do anything and if they did it would be very little. I said and the next time around if they are still in control they will not get anything.

I am in agreement with Governor Roy Cooper’s sentiments. The Trump Administration and Congress’ measly funding for federal disaster for Hurricane Matthew were extremely disappointing. It’s less than 1 percent of what the state requested.

Governor Cooper requested more than $900 million in federal relief which is quite a conservative request in comparison to the damage done by Hurricane Matthew. Only $6.1 million in federal money was approved. This isn’t even enough to bring affected areas back to “prior fund damage” levels.

What I’d hoped for was exactly what our Governor requested for federal funding for:

▪ Housing repairs: $166 million for homeowners’ repairs, $63.7 million to repair rental housing, $15.2 million to repair public housing.

▪ Agriculture: $92.6 million to cover losses the U.S. Department of Agriculture didn’t cover, such as livestock, equipment and feed.

▪ Small business: $39 million to help close to 700 small businesses.

The above areas had the most impact in my District.

I call upon my Senate leaders to come up with additional funding, either through an immediate supplemental spending bill or in the next appropriations process to provide the much needed investment in recovery.

Being that North Carolina was underfunded at the federal level, it is unacceptable and shameful that the Senate budget fails North Carolinians affected by the storm. Hurricane Matthew was a catastrophic event that is best responded to outside of our biennium budget process. The appropriations should have never been included with the limitations of a $22.9 billion spending cap. We can do better than this. We are better than this. This budget does not reflect it!

Hurricane Floyd, Hurricane Matthews And Just Plain Rain Edgecombe County Bynum Farm Road Pinetops NC, Princeville NC And Surrounding Areas

During Hurricane Floyd in September 1999, Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 and just plain rain on April 26, 2017 Bynum Farm Road suffered from flooding. Everyone know what devastation Floyd and Matthew brought to the areas of Bynum Farm Road Pinetops NC and Princeville NC along with other areas in Edgecombe County. Just the plain rain caused the folk on Bynum Farm Pinetops NC to evacuate again but no water got into any homes in the area that I am aware of.

If folk didn’t see Bynum Farm Road Pinetops NC on the news a couple of days ago you would only think that Princeville NC is the only area in the county that flood. You only hear about Princeville NC because it is the oldest black town incorporated by Slaves. That is all well and fine but it ain’t just about Princeville NC.

Bynum Farm Road and Princeville both should not have been any houses in the area. Okay but they are there so ain’t no need to talk about it now. The talk is it has been some major flooding in our life time when it was said during Hurricane Floyd that it would probably be another 500 years or a 100 years. Well Hurricane Matthew was 17 years later. And then the plain rain flood was 6 months later. So we can forget about the predictions of when the next flood may come.

These Floods!

What I know is that Trump and the Republicans are running things.

What I know is Governor Roy Cooper can ask for anything but has to deal with the Republican majority here in the NC General Assembly.

What it looks like to me is FEMA or whoever is continuing to extend the deadline for the Hazardous Mitigation Program making sure folk think about what is going on.

I sure know because my dad stayed with me from October til the 2nd week of March. And then a couple of days ago he had to come out again but luckily no water got in anybody’s house. This is Pinetops NC Bynum Farm Road about 12 miles from Princeville NC.

What I do know is whatever choices folk make with all of this going on they will have to live with it.

 

Our View: Need for storm relief won’t go away – Rocky Mount Telegram

On a national scale, Hurricane Matthew doesn’t prompt quite the response as historic storms like Sandy, Katrina and Andrew. But to North Carolina residents, Matthew was every bit as catastrophic. Even now — six months after the hurricane made landfall — hundreds of people are still living in temporary shelters.

That’s why FEMA and Congress should renew efforts to help North Carolina build back from this horrible disaster, as Gov. Roy Cooper recently requested.

As reported by Telegram staff writer Lindell John Kay, Cooper has asked for almost $1 billion in federal disaster relief funds to help victims of Hurricane Matthew. (Read more)

Some entire NC towns may become vacant memorials to Matthew – News & Observer

The Watch Dog response: For all of my Princeville friends, this thing is real and it ain’t just an issue in Princeville. The town of Princeville need to submit their plan and see what the NC General Assembly and all the resources involved will respond.

FAIR BLUFF

Almost nothing has changed in downtown Fair Bluff since Hurricane Matthew sent the Lumber River out of its banks and three feet deep into the businesses that lined Main Street last October.

A few of the century-old buildings have been emptied out, but dried river mud coats the warped floors and black mold laces the walls. Ruined paint cans and brushes sit on the shelves at Ellis Meares & Son True Value, and in a shop where former mayor Randy Britt once sold women’s Sunday dresses, the chrome racks stand empty. With power still out to most of downtown, even the clock on the post outside what used to be Elvington Pharmacy is frozen in time.

“I do worry about the future of Fair Bluff,” said Micheal Green, who had MikeMike’s Computers at 1122 Main St. before the flood and has been unable to reopen. “I worry about it a lot.”

State and local officials are worried about Fair Bluff too, along with other towns and business districts in Eastern North Carolina that were hit hard by flooding from Hurricane Matthew at perhaps the most vulnerable time in their civic lives. Much of rural Eastern North Carolina had suffered huge losses when manufacturing jobs left the state in the 1980s and ’90s. That was followed by the devastation of Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and, starting in 2007, the Great Recession. (Read more)