Homegoing for Deacon Thurman Highsmith Sr. Greensboro NC Formerly of Pinetops NC.

My condolences goes out to Rev. Gregory Highsmith, Rev. Thurman Highsmith Jr. and their mother Mrs. Mary Louise Pitt Highsmith and the Highsmith and Pitt families the families of the late Deacon Thurman Highsmith Sr.

Deacon Thurman Highsmith Sr. is the brother of the late Willie “Little Bay” Highsmith Sr.

Script.: Read Eccles. 3 and know, “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven”

Song: He Has His Hands On You – Marvin Sapp

The Obituary

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Will Democrats accept Parker’s resignation? – WRAL

Response: Oh well time to get on the road to go to Greensboro to see the show down. Meet me there.

Democrats will meet in Greensboro Saturday to elect new party leaders following a scandal that broke out weeks before the primary. But the new boss might be same as the old boss if some of the party faithful get their way. (More)

See related:

North Carolina Democratic Party State Executive Committee

North Carolina State Democratic Party Executive Meeting Greensboro NC At The Marriott

I am at the North Carolina State Democratic Party Executive Meeting Greensboro NC serving in 2 capacities The DCN News Blog/Online TV and as a Delegate for Edgecombe County.

Should be an exciting and interesting day.

You still have time to get here actual meeting do not begin until 1:00 PM.

North Carolina State Democratic Party Executive Meeting Greensboro NC At The Marriott

I am the North Carolina State Democratic Party Executive Meeting Greensboro NC serving in 2 capacities The DCN News Blog/Online TV and as a Delegate for Edgecombe County.

Should be an exciting and interesting day.

You still have time to get here actual meeting do not begin until 1:00 PM.

Rev. William J. Barber to be honored with Human Rights Medal Award

EMBARGOED 7:00AM FEBRUARY 1, 2010

Contact:  Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, President, 919-394-8137

Mrs. Amina J. Turner, Exec Director, 919-682-4700

Rev. Dr. William J. Barber to be honored with Human Rights Medal Award

at the 50th Sit-In Anniversary Celebration

Celebrating the 50th Sit-In Anniversary

Today on February 1st, State NAACP President, Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II became the recipient of the Human Rights Medal Award presented in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the 1960 Greensboro lunch counter sit-in and the grand opening of the International Civil Rights Museum.

On receiving this honor, Rev. Barber remarked, “I humbly accept this award on behalf of those who fought before us in the cause of justice and human rights and those who today continue to fight for a more just society for all people.”

February One is an annual tribute to the four North Carolina A&T freshmen, Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil, Ezell Blair, Jr. (Jibreel Khazan), and the late David Richmond. Their non-violent sit-in to desegregate Woolworth’s sparked direct action by students across the south that affected the entire nation, and changed the course of the civil rights movement.

The Sit-in Program & Human Rights Medal Award took place at 6:30am at the Empire Ballroom across from the original site of the 1960 protest. The former Woolworth’s store is now the International Civil Rights Museum located at February One Place in downtown Greensboro. United States Senator Kay Hagan, Governor Bev Perdue and other state and local dignitaries participated in the grand opening on this historic occasion.

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See related:

Greensboro Civil Rights Museum

Greensboro Woolworth Civil Rights Museum Gala Postponed; Ribbon-cutting Still Set for Monday

Museum gala postponed; ribbon-cutting still set for Monday (Source: News & Observer)

Protesters reflect on success of 1960s sit-in in Greensboro store (Source: The Rocky Mount Telegram)

Celebrations mark sit-in anniversary (Source: News & Record)

Greensboro NC – City boards lack diversity

What tickles the hell out of me is how some folks jumped on the article because the reporter stated that

An analysis of six of the city’s most important council-appointed boards found that:

* Seventy-six percent of the members are men.

* Sixty-seven percent are Caucasian and the rest are African American. There are no members of any other race.

Damn so this is not a lack of diversity?

C. Dancy II – DCN Publisher

They help rewrite or interpret city laws.

They decide whether developers can build a new project or the city should annex land.

They are the members of Greensboro’s boards and commissions — people appointed to represent city residents on issues that affect quality of life.

But they aren’t exactly representative of the community. (News & Record)