Police chief credits public for help in fighting crime – Rocky Mount Telegram

While Rocky Mount Police Chief James Moore and his staff have taken heat recently from disgruntled residents, the top cop said another subset of the community stepped up recently to help put two suspected killers behind bars within hours of the slaying of an area teenager.

“Even before last Friday, we’ve had a couple neighborhoods that have been providing us with a great deal of information about disorderlies and drug activity,” Moore said Tuesday. “It has taken us four years with a focus on building trust, but it has taken hold. Then on Friday, after years of lamenting people not wanting to help us, we had so much information from witnesses at the scene, those who rode by and people who listened to their scanners.”

The tips led investigators to locate and charge both suspects within 12 hours of the drive-by shooting of Lavontae Brown. (Source: Read more)

See related:

Residents discuss crime at city council meeting – Rocky Mount Telegram 

Grant to help fund taskforce to fight drugs, gangs – Rocky Mount Telegram

 

Residents discuss crime at city council meeting – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Political Agitator’s response: You see this is what the Community Council, Fighting Crime in Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson and Halifax Counties, WHIG-TV and the likes started by spreading lies saying that the Rocky Mount Chief of Police said there was not a drug and gang problem in Rocky Mount. What a lie. See what the chief said several days ago in the Rocky Mount Telegram.

While many residents showed up for Monday’s City Council meeting, few got up to speak to Rocky Mount officials.

Social media was alight leading up to the 7 p.m. meeting about coming to speak about the city’s crime rate and Police Chief James Moore’s decision not to participate in a Nash County Sheriff’s Office-led regional taskforce, but only one resident – Christy Taylor – spoke against Moore’s decision. Taylor read the names of some of the men killed in the city this year, then said more than eight officers are needed on the department’s gang unit.

“He never once said there was no gang problem in Rocky Mount,” Penny said. “However, as far as interdiction on I-95 and U.S. 64, we believe our manpower is better targeted in our city limits rather than who or who we should not stop on I-95.” (Source: Read more)

See related:

Grant to help fund taskforce to fight drugs, gangs – Rocky Mount Telegram – See what the chief really said

Grant to help fund taskforce to fight drugs, gangs – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Political Agitator’s response: When will Ignant Racist White Folk and Ignant Safe Negroes stop twisting stuff to promote their own agenda. How in the hell did they come up with the Rocky Mount Chief of Police saying that there was not a drug and gang problem in Rocky Mount? I am glad he had the b to take a stand for which he feel is not right. Prove him wrong and then come back to me and talk about the issue of the taskforce and not that drugs and gangs is not a problem. Profiling however is a problem and not legal. But yep just my ignant opinion.
“Drug interdiction and local gangs don’t go hand in hand. Drugs passing through on the highway don’t affect Rocky Mount.”


James Moore
Rocky Mount police chief

NASHVILLE – The Nash County Board of Commissioners gave the go ahead Monday for a state grant application to pay a retired DEA agent to lead a regional antidrug and gang taskforce.

If approved by the Governor’s Crime Commission, the grant would fund a leadership position in a gang and drug taskforce for the 7th Judicial District. The leader would be a Nash County Sheriff’s Office employee managing a taskforce made up of deputies in Nash County; police officers in Nashville, Tarboro and Wilson; and agents with N.C. Probation and Parole and the N.C. State Bureau of Investigation. The Nash Sheriff’s Office still is working with the sheriff’s offices in Edgecombe and Wilson counties to get them to join, Nash Sheriff’s Maj. Dennis Wooten said.

“The Rocky Mount police chief declined to be a part of the taskforce,” Wooten told commissioners.

Wooten said the police chief doesn’t believe the city’s crime rate is driven by drugs and gangs.

Rocky Mount Police Chief James Moore said his department isn’t interested in drug interdiction on Interstate 95 and U.S. 64.

“Drug interdiction and local gangs don’t go hand in hand. Drugs passing through on the highway don’t affect Rocky Mount,” Moore said after the meeting. “And it’s impossible to engage in highway interdiction without profiling, something that’s against the inherent nature of contemporary law enforcement.”

Moore said it is an assumption that all crime is drug-related and his department conducts data-driven enforcement.

Rocky Mount has had a successful gang unit since 2012 with an officer winning state recognition for the methods used in collecting information on gangs.

During the commissioners’ meeting, Chairman Fred Belfield recommended Wooten make another attempt to bring Rocky Mount into the fold.

Commissioner Wayne Outlaw said he would like to see Rocky Mount participate in the taskforce.

“I’m disappointed we don’t have more partners,” Outlaw said. “Everyone is always talking about regionalism.”

The taskforce would allow law enforcement to operate across jurisdictional lines within the 7th Judicial District and provide instant, real-time information sharing among partnering agencies as they continue to investigate gangs and drugs in the area, Wooten said.

The original grant is for $25,000 and will pay the salary of the taskforce leader from February to June. A second grant will be sought to fund the salary from July to June 2018.

As the selected leader is a retired DEA agent with federal benefits, the grant will not seek funding to pay any fringe benefits.

The board unanimously approved the grant, which requires no matching funds from the county. The position will be evaluated prior to its expiration.

In other business, the board unanimously approved changes to county ordinances to streamline the process for correcting address problems that could delay emergency response service such as odd numbers being on the even side of a street.

The changes replaced an E-911 committee with a designated Addressing Administrator, set a 15-character limit on road names and set a $50 per day penalty for not complying with addressing requirements. (Source: Original Document)

Grant to help fund taskforce to fight drugs, gangs – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Political Agitator’s response: Folk love to twist stuff and try to say that Chief Moore said drugs and crime ain’t a problem in Rocky Mount. Now read it for yourself. “Drug interdiction and local gangs don’t go hand in hand. Drugs passing through on the highway don’t affect Rocky Mount,” Moore said after the meeting. “And it’s impossible to engage in highway interdiction without profiling, something that’s against the inherent nature of contemporary law enforcement.”

NASHVILLE – The Nash County Board of Commissioners gave the go ahead Monday for a state grant application to pay a retired DEA agent to lead a regional antidrug and gang taskforce.

If approved by the Governor’s Crime Commission, the grant would fund a leadership position in a gang and drug taskforce for the 7th Judicial District. The leader would be a Nash County Sheriff’s Office employee managing a taskforce made up of deputies in Nash County; police officers in Nashville, Tarboro and Wilson; and agents with N.C. Probation and Parole and the N.C. State Bureau of Investigation. The Nash Sheriff’s Office still is working with the sheriff’s offices in Edgecombe and Wilson counties to get them to join, Nash Sheriff’s Maj. Dennis Wooten said. (Source: Read more)

Sex, Drugs and Poverty in Red and Blue America – New York Times

The Political Agitator response: Well can’t wait to see how this get twisted!

Take the statistics in the first chart, which was produced from data collected and analyzed by Child Trends, an organization that conducts research on the quality of children’s lives. It shows that for the last few decades the out-of-wedlock birthrate among African-Americans — exceptionally high at more than 70 percent — has risen less rapidly than the white rate. Among African-Americans, the out-of-wedlock birthrate has gone from 57.3 percent in 1980 to 71.4 percent in 2013, an increase of 25 percent; the white rate over the same time period has gone up 205 percent, from 9.6 percent to 29.3 percent.

The highest rates of white teenage pregnancy in the 30 states with available data are in red states. While the national white teenage pregnancy rate in 2010 was 38 per 1,000, white rates were at least 10 points higher in nine states: Oklahoma (59), West Virginia (64), Arkansas (63), South Carolina (51), Alabama (49), Mississippi (55), Tennessee (51), Kentucky (59) and Louisiana (51). Each of these states cast decisive majorities for Romney in 2012. (Source: Read more)

Pinetops woman arrested on heroin charges – Daily Southerner

Response: I normally do not post articles like this however I think I am going to begin to post stuff like this in the future as it relates to Edgecombe County. Black criminals are in the paper all the time however some don’t think that stuff like this is happening in the white community or should I say whites committing crimes. Look at what this person has to offer versus what you normally read about what the blacks in this business has to offer.

TARBORO — Law enforcement made another heroin arrest Wednesday when they nabbed a Pinetops woman heading back into the county from Scotland Neck.

According to a press release, after receiving information, the Edgecombe County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Unit along with a Tarboro Narcotics officer, sat patiently and waited for 35-year-old Porsha Lee Lassiter to enter Edgecombe County. As she did, they stopped the vehicle she was traveling in. (More)