Black History Month Celebration March 4, 2019 G.W. Carver Elementary School Pinetops NC

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Enlightened Free Thinking Nubian Kings And Queens

The Political Agitator response: It is so much black history that it takes 365 to talk about it. I learned a lot on Sunday during a black history presentation at my church andnow reading this article. Awesome! I can’t learn it all nor can I tell it all.

The U.S. celebrates Black History Month in February to honor African-Americans’ achievements and contributions to society. People and organizations across the country hold events to recognize pioneers such as Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall and Jackie Robinson. In its earliest form, the tradition is almost 90 years old, but some people don’t know its origins.

Historian Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week, which began Feb. 12, 1926. He scheduled it at that time to match up with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

In 1976, Negro History Week became Black History Month. President Gerald Ford urged the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history,” according to the International Association of Official Human Rights Agencies. (Source: Read more)

OIC Celebrates Black History On Tuesday February 28, 2012 6:00 PM

For Immediate Release   

 

For Press Information, Contact

 Reuben Blackwell, (252) 544-3343

 

 

OIC Celebrates Black History

 

 

OIC, Inc. will present its Annual Black History Celebration on Tuesday, February 28th at 6:00 p.m., in the OIC auditorium, located at 402 East Virginia Street, Rocky Mount, NC. This year, OIC will reflect and celebrate its history from its establishment in Rocky Mount to current day programming. Genotre Penny-Boone, OIC’s Board Chair, commented that “usually, we remember and celebrate notable people that moved the country.  This year, we want to honor people, organizations and companies that have helped Rocky Mount OIC bring quality education, business, health and medical services to our communities and residents in Rocky Mount.”

 

The program will feature musical, spoken word and instrumental performances by local and nationally recognized artists including the Parker Middle School String Ensemble, the Nash Central High School Jazz Band, the Rocky Mount High School Band, the Edgecombe County High School Chorus and several outstanding vocalists and poets.  There is no charge for attendance.  Doors open at 5:40 p.m.

 

For more information, contact Vai Elekana at (252) 212-3460.

 

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The “Declining Significance” of Black History – Source: The BlackList Pub

In the middle of this year’s Black History Month I was momentarily overcome by a weird feeling. There was a kind of ho hum, mundane, routine, business as usual atmosphere about this year’s commemoration with little passion or intensity. (Read more)

See related:

Tomorrow The Last Day Of Black History Month So Then What?

Black History Month

Tomorrow The Last Day Of Black History Month So Then What?

Back to business as usual.

How can we start in March to keep the celebration going throughout the year so that it will become so strong and popular that when February rolls around again, we would not even notice that it was designated as “Black History Month.” I don’t have to remind you this is the shortest month of the year.

Please post your suggestions here about what you think can be done to keep black history going 12 months out of the year. Schools are not doing it, churches are not doing it, organizations are not doing it so is there anything that can really be done?

Just saying. Maybe it is not important.

McDonalds say they do it 365. Click here.

Embracing The Spirit, Excellence, and Legacy of HBCU 0IC’s Annual Black History Program

 

 

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Celebrating Black History Month Promoting Literacy At The National African American Read-In

clip_image001[6]Celebrate Black History Month

Promoting Literacy

 At the

National African American Read-In

 

Hosted by

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Saturday, February 19, 2011

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Wilson County Public Library – Assembly Room

249 Nash Street West, Wilson, NC 252-237-5355

 

           
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Featured Speaker:

 

Calvin L. Woodard

Sheriff, Wilson County, NC

 

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Parents, bring your children, along with one of their favorite books by or about an American of African descent, and make the 22nd National African American Read-In* a memorable opportunity to share the joy of reading with all ages, genders, cultures, and religions.

SPACE IS LIMITED so please arrive early!

Refreshments will be served during the 3:00 o’clock intermission.

For more information, contact:  E.D. Arrington at (252) 293-1135

or earrington@myglnc.com, or http://www.edarringtonbooks.com

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*February 2011 marks the 22nd anniversary of the National African American Read-In founded by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and its Black Caucus to promote literacy. Teaching our youth to embrace the joy of reading is one way we can all make a difference. When our youth succeed, we all win!