Duke deal could lower power bills in eastern NC towns – WRAL

The Political Agitator response: I remember when the Northeastern NC Committee on the Affairs of Black People which consisted of Carol Batchelor, Lewis Turner, Andre Knight, myself and a few others had a community meeting about the utilities at Truth Tabernacle back in 1999 or early 2000’s. This is when we found out about there was such a thing called ElectriCities. The fight began at that time to do something about the high utility rates. Andre Knight went on to become a Rocky Mount City Councilman and also began serving on NCEMPA Board North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency after former Rocky Mount City Councilwoman and former NCEMPA board member Angela Bryant moved on to become a House of Representative and now a current Senator. Knight played a strong role in challenging ElectriCities to do something about the high utilities in the 32 cities. Rocky Mount lead a lawsuit and a couple cities started out with them but eventually backed out. Rocky Mount Councilman and NCEMPA board member Andre Knight was responsible for stopping former Tarboro Town Manager Sam Nobles from receiving $1500 a month to chair the NCEMPA board meetings while the other board members received nothing but a free meal from Parkers if they chose to go there after the meetings held in Wilson. Don’t want to leave out that we also played a role in the Common Ground meetings under the direction of now Councilwoman Chris Miller leadership as there were several meetings held about utilities.

Raleigh, N.C. — A Duke Energy unit has agreed to buy out the North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency’s interests in power plants formerly owned by Progress Energy for $1.2 billion, officials said Monday.

NCEMPA has partial ownership interests in several plants, including the Shearon Harris Nuclear Plant in Wake County, the Brunswick Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2 in Brunswick County and the Mayo Plant Unit 1 and Roxboro Plant Unit 4, both in Person County.

Thirty-two municipalities belong to NCEMPA, including Apex, Wake Forest, Louisburg, Clayton, Smithfield, Rocky Mount and Wilson, and customers have complained for years about high electric rates because of they are still paying off debt incurred from building the power plants. (Source: Read more)

Edgecombe school board OKs personnel changes – Rocky Mount Telegram

TARBORO – In a relatively quick meeting Monday to deal with personnel, the Edgecombe County Board of Education approved 24 resignations while giving its OK to bring 24 new employees into the fold.

Called specifically for a closed session to discuss personnel, the board spent barely 20 minutes in closed session before returning to open session and unanimously approving its list of employee moves.

New to the system are 15 teachers, one administrator, seven other permanent hires and one temporary hire. (Source: Read more)

Sale of power plants raises hopes for lower electric rates – Rocky Mount Telegram

The Political Agitator response: I remember when the Northeastern NC Committee on the Affairs of Black People which consisted of Carol Batchelor, Lewis Turner, Andre Knight, myself and a few others had a community meeting about the utilities at Truth Tabernacle back in the 1999 or early 2000’s. This is when we found out about there was such a thing called ElectriCities. The fight began at that time to do something about the high utility rates. Andre Knight went on to become a Rocky Mount City Councilman and also began serving on NCEMPA Board North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency after former Rocky Mount City Councilwoman and former NCEMPA board member Angela Bryant moved on to become a House of Representative and now a current Senator. Knight played a strong role in challenging ElectriCities to do something about the high utilities in the 32 cities. Rocky Mount lead a lawsuit and a couple cities started out with them but eventually backed out. Rocky Mount Councilman and NCEMPA board member Andre Knight was responsible for stopping former Tarboro Town Manager Sam Nobles from receiving $1500 a month to chair the NCEMPA board meetings while the other board members received nothing but a free meal from Parkers if they chose to go there after the meetings held in Wilson. Don’t want to leave out that we also played a role in the Common Ground meetings under the direction of now Councilwoman Chris Miller leadership as there were several meetings held about utilities.

While the full extent of the local impact is yet to be determined, Rocky Mount officials were thrilled about a deal that is likely to reduce rates for the city’s 27,000 electric customers.

“It is encouraging, but we are cautiously optimistic because all the I’s have to be dotted and the T’s have to be crossed before the deal is final,” Rocky Mount City Manager Charles Penny said. “We are one step closer and I hope our rate payers are encouraged because if this goes through, they should benefit.”

According to a Monday morning announcement, Duke Energy Progress agreed to pay $1.2 billion for N.C. Eastern Municipal Power Agency’s generating assets in five facilities as well as fuel inventories and spare parts. Rocky Mount is among 32 cities in the Power Agency that took on $3.6 billion in debt to build nuclear power plants and whose customers have worked to pay down that debt to about $1.9 billion during the past three decades. (Source: Read more)