NC NAACP NEWS RELEASE: MARCH & PUBLIC MASS DEMONSTRATION, JULY 20TH

Immediate Release

19 July 2010

Contact:  Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, President, naacpbarber@gmail.com, 919-394-8137

              Mrs. Amina J. Turner, Exec Dir, 336-327-7848

              Alan McSurely, Esq., Communications Chair, 919-389-2905

NC NAACP MEDIA ADVISORY

WHEN:  TUESDAY, JULY 20 10AM

WHERE:  CONVENE AT RALEIGH CONVENTION CENTER

<MAP ATTACHED>

WHAT:       MARCH AND PUBLIC MASS DEMONSTRATION

THEME:  FOR OUR CHILDREN

WE SAY NO TO RESEGREGATION!

WE SAY YES TO SOCIO-ECONOMIC DIVERSITY

AND SCHOOL EXCELLENCE!

Tomorrow, the State NAACP will lead a coalition of statewide supporters—representatives of the HK on J Coalition (93-member social justice organizations), American Civil Liberties Union, N.C. AFL-CIO, N.C. Council of Churches, N.C. Fair Share, N.C. Justice Center, N.C. WARN, Peace and Justice Action of Binkley Baptist Church, Progressive Democrats of N.C., Raleigh Martin Luther King, Jr. Steering Committee, Inc., Rutba House, Triangle Labor Council,Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, the YWCA of the Greater Triangle; several church denominations, the Eastern District and Piedmont District of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Durham Concerned Clergy, General Baptist State Convention, United Church of Christ; parent and student advocacy groups, Coalition of Concerned Citizens for African American Children, Great Schools in Wake Coalition, N.C. HEAT, School for Conversion, Wake Education Advocates, and local pastors from Martin Street Baptist Church,  Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, and NAACP members from across the state in a march against resegregation in downtown Raleigh. 

This public mass non-violent demonstration is against the dismantling of the nationally acclaimed socio-economic student assignment plan by the new anti-diversity caucus of the Wake County Board of Education.  Marchers are demanding that Wake County Schools and all school districts in North Carolina provide a constitutional, high quality, well-funded, diverse school for every child.  The NAACP and its coalition partners promote seven keys to excellent schools:

1. Stop segregation and promote diversity

2. Secure equity in funding

3. Hire and retain high quality teachers

4. Have smaller class sizes

5.  Focus on Math, Science, History and Reading

6. Promote parental and community involvement

7. Eliminate inequities in suspensions, graduation rates, performance and other factors

Current research also shows that there are seven compelling benefits to promote diversity in the classroom for students and for the community:

· It is the law.

· It promotes higher academic achievement for all students and attracts and retains high quality teachers.  
Student achievement has been clearly shown to fall as the poverty level of a school rises.  High-poverty schools face multiple disadvantages in attracting and keeping qualified teachers.

· It benefits overall school ecology by promoting a culture of success.
The single most important predictor of academic achievement is family income, followed by the socioeconomic composition of the school that a student attends.

· It is more economical.
Schools composed of poor students are costlier to run.

· It results in higher levels of parent involvement.
Integrating schools has the potential to ensure that each school has a core of active parents who will demand high performance from teachers and administrators.

· It teaches children the skills necessary to succeed in a global economy.
Parents who send their children to schools with classmates only like themselves make a serious mistake.  Diversity doesn’t undermine high quality education; it enhances it.

· It benefits our most at-risk students.
Diverse schools help close achievement gaps, improve racial attitudes and lead to long-term mobility and further education for the students of color who participate.

The schedule for the day:

Pre-March Activity – 9:15-10:00 Mary Williams and her youth will review freedom songs and chants

9:50 Mary Williams welcomes the people and introduces emcees, the Rev. Anthony Davis of the AME Zion Church and Rev. Nancy Petty of Pullen Memorial Baptist.

Atty. Al McSurely, Communications Chair, Mr. Ronald White, President, South Central Wake NAACP, Rev. Curtis Gatewood, 2nd Vice President and Mr. Fred Foster, State NAACP Membership Chair will organize the crowd marchers, legal advisors in preparation for line-up.

10:05 Rev. Anthony Davis offers the Prayer of Invocation

March to the State Capitol Building -  10:10-10:40

Program at the Capitol: 10:40—11:30
1. 10:35 Music: "Rev. B and the WannaBees" with Mary Williams

2. 10:45 Wake County parents and students

3. 10:51 History and Context: Dr. Tim Tyson, Duke University, Carolyn Q. Coleman former Executive Director, NC NAACP and member National NAACP Board of Directors;

4. 10:55 Local pastors Rev. David Forbes, Senior Pastor, Christian Faith, and former member of SNCC; and rev. Nancy Petty, Pastor, Pullen Memorial Baptist;

5. 11:00 Local advocacy group leaders Great Schools in Wake Coalition; Coalition of Concerned Parents for African American Children

6. 11:05 State religious leaders: Rev. T. Anthony Spearman, AME Zion minister and N.C. NAACP state religious chair, Rev. Jimmy Hawkins of the Durham Concerned Clergy, Rev. George Reed of the NC Council of Churches, Rev. John Mendez of the General Baptist State Convention,

7. 11:10 African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church Bishops and United Methodist Church Bishops: Bishop Richard K. Thompson of the Eastern NC Episcopal District of the AME Zion Church, Bishop Al Gwinn of Eastern NC Conference of the United Methodist Church, Bishop George W.C. Walker of the Piedmont Episcopal District of the AME Zion Church
8. 11:17 NAACP – Mr. Charles Upchurch, president of the Wendell-Wake NAACP, Mrs. Amina J. Turner, Executive Director, and Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, President.

President of the NAACP and NAACP National Board Member,

Rev. Dr. William Barber II will speak.

9.  11:35 Closing Unity Benediction

10.  Final Song

Dr. Barber remarked, "The issues we face in Wake County have local, state and national implications.  This is why we must expose why this group is heading in the wrong direction…They [anti-diversity caucus of the Wake County School board] can’t hide from the facts. The recent preliminary test scores in Wake County which shows continued improvement under, Dr. Del Burns, the Superintendent they pushed out, is against them. The failed implementation of so called ‘neighborhood schools’ that has produced resegregation and high poverty schools around the country is against them.  Sound educational research is against them. We believe the laws of our constitution are against them.  The moral principles of unity and concern for all is against them. Sure, we have more work to do in Wake and throughout NC. But moving backwards, tearing apart socio-economic diversity, which is the law, and a proven friend of school excellence, is not where their energy and efforts should be engaged."

State NAACP President, Rev. Dr. William J. Barber will outline what actions will be taken at the school board meeting in his speech .  Sponsoring organizations and others who are planning to attend the school board meeting are asked to go to the Pullen Memorial Church for prayer and instruction in non-violence at 1:00pm.

We call on all religious denominations, social justice organizations, and parent and other community groups to participate in this mass, non-violent demonstration.

For Our Children We will Never Go Back to Segregated Schools.  We demand constitutional, diverse, excellent schools.

Sign your organization or group on as a supporter of this effort at diversityandexcellence@gmail.com.  For more information, go to www.naacpnc.org.

ATTACHMENT

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Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, President

Mrs. Amina Josey Turner, Exec Dir

NC NAACP
P O Box 335
Durham, NC  27702
919-682-4700 V  919-682-4711 F
1-866-NC-NAACP

Letter to Abe Lincoln From the Coloreds – Ignant Column

In every one of the dozens of interviews that I have done regarding the anti-Tea Party resolution passed by the NAACP I have brought up the absurdity of a group that calls blacks “Colored People” hurling charges of racism. Whats more, each interviewer has defended that phrase and expressed surprise that I would consider that phrase to be racist! (Read more @ Politi Fi News)

Note: It is one thing to make comments but to sign someone else’s name to them is not only ignant but criminal in my opinion. C. Dancy II – DCN Publisher

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