For the first time in our nation’s history, Congress has passed comprehensive health care reform

Curmilus —

For the first time in our nation’s history, Congress has passed comprehensive health care reform. America waited a hundred years and fought for decades to reach this moment. Tonight, thanks to you, we are finally here.

Consider the staggering scope of what you have just accomplished:

Because of you, every American will finally be guaranteed high quality, affordable health care coverage.

Every American will be covered under the toughest patient protections in history. Arbitrary premium hikes, insurance cancellations, and discrimination against pre-existing conditions will now be gone forever.

And we’ll finally start reducing the cost of care — creating millions of jobs, preventing families and businesses from plunging into bankruptcy, and removing over a trillion dollars of debt from the backs of our children.

But the victory that matters most tonight goes beyond the laws and far past the numbers.

It is the peace of mind enjoyed by every American, no longer one injury or illness away from catastrophe.

It is the workers and entrepreneurs who are now freed to pursue their slice of the American dream without fear of losing coverage or facing a crippling bill.

And it is the immeasurable joy of families in every part of this great nation, living happier, healthier lives together because they can finally receive the vital care they need.

This is what change looks like.

My gratitude tonight is profound. I am thankful for those in past generations whose heroic efforts brought this great goal within reach for our times. I am thankful for the members of Congress whose months of effort and brave votes made it possible to take this final step. But most of all, I am thankful for you.

This day is not the end of this journey. Much hard work remains, and we have a solemn responsibility to do it right. But we can face that work together with the confidence of those who have moved mountains.

Our journey began three years ago, driven by a shared belief that fundamental change is indeed still possible. We have worked hard together every day since to deliver on that belief.

We have shared moments of tremendous hope, and we’ve faced setbacks and doubt. We have all been forced to ask if our politics had simply become too polarized and too short-sighted to meet the pressing challenges of our time. This struggle became a test of whether the American people could still rally together when the cause was right — and actually create the change we believe in.

Tonight, thanks to your mighty efforts, the answer is indisputable: Yes we can.

Thank you,

President Barack Obama

Donate

Health Care Reform NCNAACP

north carolina National association

for the advancement of colored people

114 wEST pARRISH STREET, SECOND FLOOR ▪ DURHAM, NC 27701

clip_image002919/682-4700 ▪ 919/682-4711▪

Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II

President

Amina J. Turner

Executive Director

March 21, 2010

Press Release

Statement on Health Care Reform Vote

By

Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II

NC NAACP STATE PRESIDENT

Today, not only did the United States Congress pass major health reform that will benefit millions of people and families but it will also provide health insurance and the guarantee of health coverage to many who otherwise would have face sickness unprotected.

Congress, by standing strong on this vote, has helped to heal our politics. This vote says that hope is still stronger than cynicism and that the politics of conscience is still more powerful than the politics of convenience.

The NAACP has pushed for health care reform many years as a civil rights and human rights issue. Today, in the tradition of the historical cadre of civil rights leaders, organizations, and other social reformers, who have always fought for a more just society, President Obama and the members of Congress that stood with him, as did Presidents Roosevelt and Johnson in their time, have done something for the people and not just themselves. They have revived the politics of doing what is good for the general welfare of the people and not just the greed of a few.

This is a good day in America-a good day in the United States of America and we should all be proud.

See related:

Health Care

Butterfield Statement On Health Insurance Reform Passage

U.S. House of Representative SealU.S. Representative G. K. Butterfield

First District of North Carolina


For Release:  Immediate

Date:  March 21, 2010

Contact:  Ken Willis
Phone:  (202) 225-3101


Congressman G.K Butterfield statement following House passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act:

“Like Social Security and Medicare before, these reforms provide a historic step toward making good on the promise of ensuring every American has access to high-quality, affordable health care. These reforms will finally bring an end to the quiet struggle millions of Americans face each day with a system that works better for the health insurance companies than it does for them. When it comes to health care, decisions must be made by patients and their doctors, not the government or insurance companies. And that’s exactly what this bill does – it puts people back in charge. In addition to providing the biggest deficit-reducing measures since the 1990s, these long-awaited reforms make coverage more affordable for everyone and hold insurance companies accountable, stopping the worst practices like denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions, dropping coverage when someone gets sick or arbitrarily hiking up premiums.”

See related:

Health Care

House Approves Landmark Bill to Extend Health Care to Millions – Source: The New York Times

Congress gave final approval on Sunday to legislation that would provide medical coverage to tens of millions of uninsured Americans and remake the nation’s health care system along the lines proposed by President Obama. (Read more @ The New York Times)

See related:

Health Care

Anti-Abortion Democrats Pledge Support for Health Care Bill in House

House Democrats who had withheld support of the health care legislation because of abortion concerns said Sunday afternoon that they would back the bill, all but assuring that Democrats would have the 216 votes needed for passage. (Read more @ The New York Times)

See related:

Health Care

 

— House Democrats have 216 votes needed to pass health care reform, chairman of House Democratic Caucus tells CNN.

— House Democrats have 216 votes needed to pass health care reform, chairman of House Democratic Caucus tells CNN.
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Watch a special live edition of "State of the Union with Candy Crowley" tonight at 8 ET as Candy breaks down the House vote on the health care bill and takes a look at what brought us to this point. Go to: http://www.cnn.com/stateoftheunion.
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See related:

Health Care

Upbringing drives Wake’s point man on school zoning – Source: News & Observer

Upbringing drives Wake’s point man on school zoning

John Tedesco, whose election to the Wake County school board in November helped form a majority against the school system’s policy of busing for economic diversity, has emerged as the group’s front man in its push for neighborhood schools.
Updated Mar. 21, 2010 6:19 AM |
Full Story

Many Wake County schools may start later

Most Wake County elementary students could start the school day later as the district alters its schedules this fall to save money.
Updated Mar. 20, 2010 3:31 PM |
Full Story

Legislators’ grades weighted – heavily

The N.C. Association of Educators, an organization of mostly teachers, released its grades for legislators Thursday.
Updated Mar. 19, 2010 5:08 AM |
Full Story

See related:

Wake County Public Schools

Senator Don Davis NC District 5 Newsletter

N.C. District 5 Newsletter

"Serving the People of North Carolina"

Vol. 2/No. 3
March 2010

In This Issue

Remembering Kathy Taft

NC Business

TBS Pilot

Appointment

Recent Visits

2010 Elections

Don Davis
Don Davis

Mailing Address:

300 N. Salisbury St, 525

Raleigh, NC 27603-5925

(919) 733-5621

E-mail:

Don.Davis@ncleg.net

Counties:

Pitt, Wayne, and Greene

Committees:

Education

Health Care

Appropriations

Transportation

State and Local Government

Agriculture/Environment

Appropriations/Education

Select Committee on Economic Recovery

Select Committee on Energy, Science, and Technology


Quick Links

My Website

Vote History

Bills Introduced

Join Our Mailing List

:: 919-733-5621

NC Seal

Greetings!

Thank you for reading the North Carolina District 5 Newsletter.  Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns.  

                                          Regards,

Don Davis

Remembering Kathy Taft

A memorial service was held for Kathy Taft this past Saturday. She devoted her life to serving our community. Kathy was a champion for education, and did so, with a great deal of passion. Let us continue to keep her family in our prayers. 

Greenville remembers fallen soldiers

Honor

The city of Greenville has adopted the Honor and Remember Flag, which serves as a visible reminder of the lives lost in defense of our nation. After the lost of her son, Ryan, Pitt County resident Kathy Moore has spear-headed North Carolina’s efforts to gain support for adopting this Flag as an official symbol. If you would like more information, then please click here.

Economic update

According the February 2010 General Fund Revenue Report & Economic Outlook from the North Carolina General Assembly Fiscal Research Division, "General Fund revenue for the first half of the fiscal year came in about $35 million below a $11 billion target for the period." The Report also stated, "at this stage of recovery economic signals remain mixed, yet most economist believe a sustainable recovery is underway." If you would like to review the complete report, please click here.

(Source: North Carolina Fiscal Research General Fund Revenue Report and Economic Outlook, February 2010)

NC business owners gain leverage

North Carolina is enhancing purchasing opportunities for North Carolina based businesses. This is an effort to encourage 

companies to do business with the state, stimulate economic development and create jobs.  In addition, a price-matching preference will be given to North Carolina resident bidders on contracts for the purchase of goods.  If you would like to review the Executive Order, please click

here.

Targeted Business Services pilot project

My office along with the North Carolina Small Business & Technology Center (SBTDC) announce the targeted business services pilot project. This is a two-year targeted business services pilot project designed to help area businesses retain and grow jobs in our community. The SBTDC will provide personal in-depth financial and operational assessments, management advice and counseling, and market information and research to local small and mid-size businesses. You may click

here for more information or call 252-737-1385.

Appointment

North Carolina Senate President Pro Tempore Marc Basnight has appointed me to serve on the Joint Select Committee on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management Recovery. The Committee will focus on how to better prepare for natural disasters and will examine emergency response.

Recent visits

Pitt County, Chancellor Ballard’s State of the University Address

was very informative. Members of Down East Respiratory Services, Inc. met to discuss proposed medicaid changes.  I also toured

Eastern Carolina Vocational Center, met with the Pitt County Board of Education, Pitt Young Professionals, and attended a ECU Board of Visitors meeting. The 8th Annual Give Kids a Smile Day was great. I spoke at Pitt Community College’s Leadership Institute and attended a Sierra Club water resources meeting. 

Wayne County, members of the Southeastern Oncologist and I met to discuss medicaid.  I toured Spring Creek High School,

ADLA, and spoke with SEANC Distric 59. I also visited with the 4-H Club, attended the Goldsboro/Wayne County Inter-faith breakfast, and visited the Arts Council at an annual gala. The Mt. Olive Chamber and Wayne County Mental Health Association hosted wonderful banquets. I spoke with airmen at Seymour Johnson AFB and farmers at the Karl Best Agri-Leadership Program.

Greene County, the Greene County Community Foundation hosted a Mardi Gras celebration as a part of its annual fundraiser at the Edwards Dawson Home C. 1898. I made an appearance and signed books at the West Greene Elementary School Author Celebration Day. The students did an outstanding job with their books. Representatives from the United States Department of Agriculture and I met with officials from the Town of Hookerton to discuss community development efforts. 

2010 Elections

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA (STATEWIDE)

United States Senate

Democractic Candidate(s).^

James "Cal" Cunningham

        Susan Harris

        Ken Lewis

        Elaine Marshall

Marcus Williams

        Wilma "Ann" Worthy

Republican Candidate(s).^

        Edward "Eddie" Burks       

        Richard Burr (i) 

        Bradford "Brad" Jones

        Larry Linney

   Libertarian(s).

Michael Beitler

North Carolina Supreme Court

Associate Justice (Brady Seat)

       Barbara Jackson

       Robert "Bob" Hunter

North Carolina Court of Appeals

Court of Appeals Judge (Steelman Seat)

Sanford Steelman (i)

Court of Appeals Judge (Calabria Seat)^

     Ann Marie Calabria (i)

      Mark E. Klass

      Jane Gray

Court of Appeals Judge (Elmore Seat)^

    Alton "Al" Bain

     Leto Copeley

     Richard "Rick" Allen Elmore (i)

     Steven Walker

Court of Appeals Judge (Geer Seat)

    Martha Anne Geer (i)

     Dean R. Poirier

PITT COUNTY

United States Congressional Disrtict 1

Democractic Candidate(s).^

G. K. Butterfield (i)

       Chad Larkins

Republican Candidate(s).^

John Carter

       Jerry Grimes 

       James "Jim" Miller

       Ashley Woolard 

United States Congressional District 3

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Johnny Rouse

Republican Candidate(s).^

       Robert "Bob" Cavanaugh       

       Walter B. Jones (i)

      Craig Weber

Libertarian Candidate(s).

       Darryl Holloman

North Carolina Senate Distirct 3

Democratic Candidate(s).^

       Florence Armstrong

Frankie Bordeaux

Clark Jenkins (i)

Republican Candidate(s).^

C. B. Daughtridge

       Henry Williams

North Carolina Senate District 5

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Don Davis (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

       Louis Pate

North Carolina House of Representatives District 6

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Arthur Williams (i)

      Republican Candidate(s).

       William Cook

North Carolina House of Representative District 8^

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Mildred Council

Edith Warren (i)

North Carolina House of Representative District 9

   Democractic Candidate(s).

Marian Mclawhorn (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

Stanley Larson

Pitt County Board of Commissioners

County Commissioner District 1:

Democratic Candidate(s).

David Hammond (i)

County Commissioner District 2:^

Democratic Candidate(s).

Eugene James (i)

Willie Wallace

       Reginald Walton

Republican Candidate(s).

       Joey Moore

County Commissioner District 3:

Democratic Candidate(s).

Thomas Johnson (i)

County Commissioner District 4:

Democratic Candidate(s).

Mark Owens (i)

County Commissioner District 5:

Republican Candidate(s).

Jimmy Garris (i)

County Commissioner District 6:

Democratic Candidate(s).^

Kenneth Ross (i)

Michael House

Republican Candidate(s).

Glen Webb

Pitt County Board of Education-(Nonpartisan)

Board of Education Seat 1A:^

  Michael Dixon (i)

Teresa Lee

Board of Education Seat 2A:^

       Ed Congleton

Ann Johnson

Billy Peaden (i) 

Kay Rouse

Board of Education Seat 3A:^

Walter Gaskins

       Juvencia Peralta

       Christine Waters

Board of Education Seat 4A:^

      Earlie Barnes

       Melissa Grimes

       Jonathan Taggett

       Marc Whichard

Board of Education Seat 5A:^

     Sean Kenny

       Gary Lee

       Bryan Patonay

       Barbara Pryor

Board of Education Seat 6A:^

      Joy Bostic

       Worth Forbes

       Shawn House

Pitt County Sheriff

Democratic Candidate(s).^

Neil Elks

Mac Manning (i)

Clerk of Superior Court

Democratic Candidate(s).^

Wallace Gibbs

Sara Beth Rhodes (i)

District Attorney District 3A

      William "Clark" Everett (i)   

District Court Judges

District Court Judge District 3A (Blick Seat)

Joseph "Joe" Blick, Jr. (i)    

District Court Judge District 3A (Hilburn Seat)

Gwyn Hilburn (i)

WAYNE COUNTY 

United States Congressional Disrtict 1

Democractic Candidate(s).

G. K. Butterfield (i)^

       Chad Larkins

Republican Candidate(s).^

John Carter

       Jerry Grimes 

       James "Jim" Miller

       Ashley Woolard 

United States Congressional District 3

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Johnny Rouse

Republican Candidate(s).^

       Robert "Bob" Cavanaugh

       Walter Jones

(i)

       Craig Weber

Libertarian Candidate(s).

       Darryl Holloman

North Carolina Senate District 5

Democractic Candidate(s).

       Don Davis (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

       Louis Pate

North Carolina Senate District 12

Democractic Candidate(s).

Jody Mcleod

Republican Candidate(s).

David Rouzer (i)

North Carolina House of Representatives District 10

Democractic Candidate(s).

Van Braxton (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

Stephen Laroque

North Carolina House of Representaives District 11

Republican Candidate(s).

        Efton Sager (i)

North Carolina House of Representative District 21

   Democractic Candidate(s).

Larry Bell (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

Deann Poirier

Wayne County Board of Education

Board of Education District 1:     

Don "Chris" West

Board of Education District 4:

  John "Phil" Grantham (i)

Board of Education District 5:^

      Arnold Flowers

George Moye (i)

Board of Education District 6:^

Trebor "Tree" Jackson

Richard "Rick" Pridgen (i)

Wayne County Sheriff

    Democratic Candidate(s).

Glenn Barnes

    Republican Candidate(s).    

Carey Winders (i)

Clerk of Superior Court

    Democratic Candidate(s).

Pamela "Pam" Minshew (i)

District Attorney District 8

Democratic Candidate(s).

       C. Branson "Branny" Vickory, III (i)

District Court Judge District 8 (Heath Seat)

       Beth Heath (i)

GREENE COUNTY

United States Congressional Disrtict 1

Democractic Candidate(s).^

    G. K. Butterfield (i)

       Chad Larkins

Republican Candidate(s).^

    John Carter

       Jerry Grimes 

       James "Jim" Miller

       Ashley Woolard 

North Carolina Senate District 5

     Democractic Candidate(s).

Don Davis(i)

     Republican Candidate(s).

   Louis Pate

North Carolina House of Representatives District 10

Democractic Candidate(s).

Van Braxton (i)

Republican Candidate(s).

Stephen Laroque

Greene County Board of Commissioners

     Democratic Candidate(s).^

Albert Barron

Jack Edmondson (i)

Denny Garner (i)

Bennie Heath (i)

Lyn Lane

JoAnn Artis Stevens

Greene County Board of Education

    Democratic Candidate(s).^

Pat Adams (i)

Jerry Carraway (i)

Terry Forbes

Joe Smith (i)

Lorrine Washington

    Republican Candidate(s).

Brent Maupin

Greene County Sheriff

    Democratic Candidate(s).^

John Hunt

       Lemmie Smith (i)      

Clerk of Superior Court

    Democratic Candidate(s).

Sandra Sutton (i)

District Attorney District 8

    Democratic Candidate(s).

     C. Branson "Branny" Vickory, III (i)

District Court Judge District 8 (Heath Seat)

Beth Heath (i)

(i)    -   incumbent

^    -   On May 4, 2010 ballot

Correction: In the Vol. 2/No. 2 Newsletter, WITN 9 was sourced. This should have been WNCT 9.  

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NC Senator Don Davis | 300 N. Salisbury Street, 525 | Raleigh | NC | 27603

This Monday: NC Supreme Court Hears School-to-Prison Pipeline Case

This Monday: NC Supreme Court Hears School-to-Prison Pipeline Case [1 Attachment]

Date: Thursday, March 18, 2010, 3:49 PM

On Monday, March 22, at 9:30 AM, the Supreme Court of North Carolina
will hear oral arguments in the case of two Beaufort County students who
were excluded from educational opportunities for nearly five months, due
to a five second fight in the school courtyard. For the first time, our
State’s highest Court will consider the implications of long-term
suspension from school — an epidemic in North Carolina — on students’
fundamental constitutional right to education.
Please come (early – the school boards’ supporters will also be
gathering, and the Justices need to know that the students have strong
support, too) to the Supreme Court, at 2 East Morgan Street, in downtown
Raleigh. A map, showing parking decks near the courthouse, is attached.
The argument begins at 9:30.
If you’d like to read the briefs (see below for all the wonderful
individuals and groups who wrote and joined amici briefs in support of
the students), go to: 
http://www.ncappellatecourts.org/nc_main_1.nsf,
and search, by case number, for 480A09.
Jane Wettach, Director of the Children’s Law Clinic at Duke Law School,
will be arguing for the students. Lewis Pitts and Erwin Byrd of
Advocates for Children’s Services of Legal Aid are co-counselling with
Jane. More than 45 individuals and groups, whose names follow, joined in
as amici in support of the students:
I.    JUSTICE ROBERT F. ORR AND JUDGE CHARLES L. BECTON
II.     NORTH CAROLINA ADVOCATES FOR JUSTICE – filed by Travis Payne of
Edelstein and Payne
III.    IN-STATE ORGANIZATIONS BRIEF – filed by Jack Holzman of the
North Carolina  Justice     Center, on behalf of:
1.    Concerned Citizens for the Betterment of Beaufort County Schools
2.    The North Carolina Justice Center
3.    ACLU of North Carolina
4.    North Carolina Black Leadership Caucus
5.    Parents Supporting Parents (of Guilford County)
6.    The Southern Coalition for Social Justice
7.    The Center for Death Penalty Litigation
8.    The Office of the Juvenile Defender
9.    North Carolina Conference of NAACP Branches
10.    Tamar Birckhead
IV.    COUNCIL FOR CHILDREN’S RIGHTS – filed by Laurie Gallagher
V.     NATIONAL BRIEF, filed by Benita Jones of the North Carolina
Center for Civil     Rights of the NC School of Law, on behalf of:
1.    Advancement Project
2.    Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, Inc. and Legal Aid of
Western Ohio, Inc.
3.    Advocates for Children of New York (AFC)
4.    The Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program (ADAP)
5.    The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
6.    The Barton Child Law & Policy Clinic
7.    The Center for Civil Rights at UNC School of Law
8.    The Charles Hamilton Houston Intitute for Race and Justice at
Harvard Law School
9.    The Children and Family Justice Center
10.    The Children’s Law Center of Massachusetts
11.    Connecticut Legal Services, Inc.
12.    The Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates
13.    Education Law Center
14.    Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana
15.    The Legal Aid Society of Birmingham
16.    The Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago
17.    The NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, Inc.
18.    The National Association of council for Children
19.    The National Association of Social Workers
20.    The National Children’s Law Network
21.    The National Economic and Social Rights Initiative
22.    The New York Law School Racial Justice Project
23.    Public Counsel
24.    The Southern Poverty Law Center
25.    TeamChild
26.    The University of Tennessee College of Law Education Law
Practicum
27.    Sharon A. Bourne-Clarke
28.    Melissa Kenney Ngaruri, Esq.
29.    Heather E. Price, MA
30.    Russell Skiba, Ph.D.
31.    Anita Wadhwa
32.    Julie Waterstone
Thank you for fighting for students’ rights.
Erwin Byrd
Staff Attorney
Advocates for Children’s Services
Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc.
P.O. Box 2101
Durham, NC  27702
(919)226-0051, ext. 417 (telephone)
(919)226-0566 (fax)

Dan Coleman on Economic Diversity Wake County Public Schools – Should One Class of People Be “Looked After” By Another?

RWCA members,

Last night I allowed my disdain for economic diversity to control my tongue and my actions.   My mia culpa does not diminish my belief that economic diversity has exacerbated the idea that one class of people should be "looked after" by another.  It inherently states that financial net worth is more important than human net worth.  For the residents and businesses of SE Raleigh it has created a culture that you can not do for yourself.  For a kid that grew up on the knees of the likes of Dan & Bertha Coleman, Fred Carnage, The Very Reverend John Milton Coleman, John W. Winters, John P. Top Greene and AW Solomon, not being able to do for one’s self has never been their modus operindi.  These people worked with people of like mind and not, matching their resources, if only proportionally with others to captain not only their own lives but the community itself.  Economic Diversity has given the green light to the notion that you are not expected to do for yourself and in its worse disguise fosters the "poverty pimping" that I think has destroyed so much of the low wealth communities of Raleigh and Wake County.

But a leader is suppose to bring people together not run them away from one another or the issues.  Notwithstanding the fact that I brought Edna Earles to the group some many months ago, with the help of Representative Deborah Ross, to advise us that what the ‘other side’ could not do through the courts they were poised to do through the ballot box, ‘our side’ failed to prepare and the rest is history. 

Cash Michaels was right on point when he said the backlash at the ballot box was part of our inability to handle the growth spurt we were experiencing earlier in this 21st century.  I remember all the talk then was about we had over 100 people moving here a day as if that was verification that what ever we were doing was right on point.  We expanded all segments of our society with total disregard to the impact it was having on those segments and the county in general.  This past October and November was in essence our comeuppance for this total disregard.  During this period the RWCA tried to get a commitment before the most recent school bond was passed to build schools in the southeast quadrant only to hear that the growth was not there along the Rock Quarry Road corridor.  Good schools in close proximity to new subdivisions is without a doubt the most basic economic engine in our society and satisfies the basic tenant of real estate, location, location, location.

The motion was carried last night that the RWCA will go on record supporting our current economic diversity policy and I will send that letter out today or tomorrow just as the motion was made. 

This morning I read the article in today’s News and Observer titled "Wake’s indefensible suspensions" and wondered to myself and to our de facto parliamentarian was there a correlation between our economic diversity policy and this terrible problem we have that seems to prove that Wake County Public Schools are a party to the concept of "school to prison pipeline"?

In closing, irrespective of the vote by the Wake County Board of Education on "diversity" the RWCA has to commit itself to several key issues relating  the education of our children and these are my suggestions for our members to consider:

                                            -  how can we support a stronger link between parents and their children’s

                                               educational experience especially for those parents that are economically

                                               challenged and not in close proximity to the schools their children attend;

                                           -  how can we direct community resources, through the school’s facilities, to

                                              the families, especially those families that are on Free and Reduced 

                                              Lunches.  I think there is universal agreement that parents have to do more 

                                              and those on the bubble are not able to do more;

                                          -  how do we end the practice of our schools being part of the "schools to

                                             prison pipeline"; and

                                         -  how do we work with our low wealth communities so they can grow and

                                            prosper without external gentrification?

Therefore at our regular April meeting these issues will be on the agenda and volunteers will be required so we can deal with these and other issues as we address the education of our children.

Thanking you all for your continued support of the RWCA.

Dan Coleman
Raleigh Wake Citizens Association

See related:

Wake County Public Schools

Ron Margiotta Speech to The North Raleigh Republican Club Discusses Breaking Up The County’s School System

Subject: WRAL video of Mr. Margiotta’s speech, Great Schools Forum

WRAL has the full video of Chairman Ron Margiotta’s speech to the North Raleigh Republican Club.  In his talk, he discusses breaking up the County’s school system, and he got big cheers for saying he was ending "busing for the sake of diversity."  He said "No one should be shocked–it (diversity) was the main issue of the campaign."  He says those opposing him and the new Board majority are those "who lost the election" in the fall and those "who do not accept the election."  He emphasized how "strong" the five majority Board members are as a group.

Hear research and data on the Wake County Public School System at the March 20 forum sponsored by Great Schools in Wake.  Mr. Margiotta and Debra Goldman were invited but declined the invitation to speak at the forum.  There will be other national, state, and local speakers, including folks from Charlotte as well as Raleigh. 

More details are online about Won’t You Be My Neighbor?  The Great Schools in Wake Coalition Forum.  It will be held Saturday, March 20, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm, with Community Action Sessions, 1:30 to 2:30 pm; McKimmon Center, NC State University, 1100 Gorman Street (corner of Western Blvd.), Raleigh;  Nationally recognized speakers include Gerald Grant, author of Hope and Despair in the American City:  Why There are no Bad Schools in Raleigh; Richard Kahlenberg, Senior Fellow, Century Foundation; former WCPSS Superintendent Bill McNeal; Benita Jones, JD, UNC School of Law; and others.  Go online to register.  Admission is free and open to the public.

See related:

Wake County Public Schools

Diversity policy voted down in tense meeting – Source: The News & Observer

RALEIGH In a chaotic and conflict-filled meeting, Wake County’s school board voted Tuesday night to kill the district’s long-standing diversity policy and begin implementing neighborhood schools. (Read more @ The News & Observer)

An opinion from a DCN Reader

Wow!  Even if this was remotely good intending, this formula to eliminate “diversity busing” harms not only children of color, but it also harms the opportunities for Caucasian children to be exposed to other cultures early.  Making the claim for neighborhood “only” schools would seem to be the perfect recipe for “turning back” the clocks particularly given that existing and poorer schools are currently NOT adequately funded and because existing funding seems chronically limited and always favors building new/modern schools in high growth areas. This seems to be a perpetual chase without win for those that cannot afford to move to the better area.  Often the new and modern schools have some of the “best teachers” and student ratios and are often away from economically deprived areas and areas of color.    The courts have long been a better ally of last resort for demanding equal and adequate funding for existing schools and for demanding this reasonable equality before allowing new schools to be built.  What say you?   This is not just a local issue strategy for preserving the best opportunities for the select few while using the collective’s resources.  Amazing – elimination of the diversity policy reminds me so much of the plan and justification for “Separate But equal Schools” but in this case it seems to allow an exemption for socioeconomic status because of the neighborhood you live in.

Just an opinion,

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Wake County Public Schools