Raleigh NC – Wal-Mart plans to add 3,000 jobs in N.C. this year

Retail giant Wal-Mart plans to expand its North Carolina work force by 3,000 this year despite the recession.

“In a time when many are suffering, we want North Carolinians to know that we are here to stay,” Cameron said. (Wral TV 5)

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Nashville NC – Tractor maker moving to Rocky Mount

Now I am confused here because there are some folks in the Twin Counties who say that we have an uneducated workforce. I find the following comments to be quite interesting. C. Dancy II – Publisher “After looking at other states, we were very impressed with the educated and skilled work force that North Carolina offers, particularly in Nash County,”. . .

A subsidiary of a Korean heavy-equipment manufacturer will establish its U.S. headquarters and a distribution and manufacturing facility in Nash County, officials said Wednesday.

LS Tractor USA LLC, a distributor of high-end compact tractors and implements, plans to invest nearly $14 million and create 134 jobs during the next five years that will pay an average annual wage of $41,500, plus benefits, officials said. (WRAL TV 5)

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Nash County lands manufacturing plant

Wilson NC – NAACP request sets racial progress back

I would like to respond to Friday’s article, “NAACP wants black D.A.” When I hear names like Andre Knight and William Barber spearheading agendas that reflect the epitome of prejudice, it makes me wonder why they are allowed to do so. There are laws that prevent individuals and organizations from promoting prejudice of any shape, form or fashion. (Wilson Times)

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Edgecombe County – District Attorney Appointment At A Glance

Speaking Truth To Power – BLACKS SAY “LIFT THE EMBARGO ON CUBA!” by William Reed Columnist

A recent Black Caucus delegation visitation to Cuba has riled up America’s anti-Fidel Castro forces.  They are against lifting the 47-year-old trade and travel embargoes of that island nation.  President Barack Obama proposes lifting travel restrictions on Cuban-Americans, but Black Caucus delegation members say the larger economic blockade of Cuba should also be brought to an end.

Over the years the Black Caucus has sought trade and travel with the Caribbean country just 90 miles off US shores.  A Congressional Black Caucus 2000 delegation set up a model for the two countries working together.  Regarding the subject of underserved medical needs of American inner cities, Castro suggested granting scholarships to low-income youths selected by the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) to come to Cuba and study medicine.   The 2009 delegation found over 100 American students – more than half of them black – enrolled in the program at the Latin American School of Medicine (LASM).  LASM is a prominent part of the Cuban healthcare system and is possibly the largest medical school in the world.   The CBC’s scholars receive free educations as doctors, nurses and dentists.  Rev. Lucius Walker, executive director of the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization, the New York-based group that receives and processes the applications for the scholarship says “We see it as a tremendous opportunity to help provide quality medical care in underserved communities”.  (According to the U.S. Census, only about 5% of U.S. doctors are black)

At the recent Summit of the Americas, President Obama suggested that the U.S. could learn a lesson of goodwill from Cuba.  In 1998, Cuba’s government began programs to send large-scale medical assistance to poor populations affected by natural disasters.  Each year some 2,000 young people enroll at the school, which operates from a former naval base in a suburb of Havana.  Cuba’s 21 medical faculties all train young people of poor families from throughout the Americas, as well as hundreds of African, Arab, Asian and European students.   The country sends teams of doctors all over the world to respond to natural disasters.  Cuban doctors have provided medical services to the underserved in Africa for over a decade.

Blacks’ views of relations with Cuba differ vastly from those of most Cuban immigrants and Cuban-Americans.  The former lily-white upper crust of Cuban society wield political clout in Florida and are dead set against normalizing relations with Cuba’s government.  Consequently most politicians have chosen to adopt Cuban-American views.  From 1960 to 1979, hundreds of thousands of Cubans began new lives in the US.  Most of these Cuban Americans came were from educated upper and middle classes and form the backbone of the anti-Castro movement.  Cuban Americans are America’s fifth-largest Hispanic group and the largest Spanish-speaking group of white descent.

Back home, Black Cubans made great advances in the past four decades and are often cited as one of the signal accomplishments of Castro’s revolution.  The medical programs are an example.  Cuban officials report there being 13,000 black physicians among the country’s 11 million people, compared to America’s 20,000 black doctors in its population of 290 million.

At present, the embargo limits American businesses from conducting business with Cuban interests.  It is the most enduring trade embargo in modern history.  Despite the embargo, the US is the fifth largest exporter to Cuba (5.1% of Cuba’s imports are from the US). Polling indicates that the American public is ambivalent about continuing the embargo.  A 2007 AP/Ipsos Poll indicates that 48% of Americans favor continuing the embargo, against 40% who favor ending it.

Mainstream media joined anti-Castro hardliners denouncing the Black Caucus position on Cuba, but that view is also opposed by business leaders who claim that freer trade would be good for Cuba and the United States.  Like the Black Caucus, US corporate interests are impatient to do business with Cuba. Oil companies want to drill offshore, farmers to export more rice, vegetables and meat, construction firms to build infrastructure projects.  Young Cubans from families exiled to Florida are less radical than their parents and also advocate ending the policy.

(William Reed – http://www.BlackPressInternational.com)

Wilson NC – Butterfield calls for diversity among DAs

U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield has echoed the calls of area black leaders in petitioning Gov. Bev Perdue to consider appointing a black attorney to be head prosecutor of the judicial district that covers Nash, Edgecombe and Wilson counties. (Rocky Mount Telegram)

See related:

Edgecombe County – District Attorney Appointment At A Glance