Baltimore MD – Trust him to protect you?

Watch the video. Then help make police respect the people they’re supposed to protect.

Dear Curmilus,

Take a look at this video of a Pennsylvania police officer joking about a just-murdered man… and mocking the man’s grieving mother. “We’re looking at it like, ‘One less drug dealer to deal with,'” the Erie, PA, police officer says. “Cool.” The murder victim, described as a loving father, had no history of drug violations, according to news reports.

Would you trust this policeman to protect you and your community? I wouldn’t.

Too many police officers still have attitudes like this toward the communities they are patrolling, highlighting the problems we still need to address: ending racial profiling, the high rate of unsolved murders in African American communities, police brutality and other forms of unequal justice for African Americans and Latinos.

Working with the NAACP, you can help change this situation:

First, e-mail Erie Mayor Joe Sinnott and ask him to order an immediate independent investigation into the practices and policies of the Erie police department and to establish an independent civilian review board to investigate citizen complaints.

Second, ask your member of Congress to co-sponsor legislation to provide long-needed regulation of harsh and careless police actions throughout the United States, the End Racial Profiling Act and the Law Enforcement Trust and Integrity Act.

These bills are designed to curb outrages like the New Year’s Day shooting of unarmed Oscar Grant by transit police in Oakland; the police shooting of Robert Tolan on his front lawn in Bellaire, Texas; and the questionable death of high school football player Billie Joe Johnson, killed in what was described as a “routine traffic stop” in Lucedale, Mississippi. NAACP branches are grappling with each of these cases.

The Law Enforcement Trust and Integrity Act also includes provisions to assist local law enforcement agencies in doing more effective screening of candidates for law enforcement jobs before they are given the power to use deadly force and then during in-service reviews. It also supports the creation of local police accountability and review boards with subpoena power, independent investigatory power, and staffing and other resources needed to provide local community oversight of their law enforcement officers.

While most police officers are courageous public servants, continued police abuses are harming our communities and eroding the trust needed to both prevent and solve crimes. Take action now and help us do something about it.

Sincerely,

Ben Jealous
Benjamin Todd Jealous
President and CEO
NAACP

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Raleigh NC – Easley campaign paid for vehicle feds are investigating

Former Gov. Mike Easley used campaign money to help pay for an SUV used by his son while Easley was in office, according to documents filed with the State Board of Elections. (WRAL TV 5)

Rocky Mount NC – Considering the D.A. Appointment in the 7th Judicial District? Like these Numbers?

The following information below was recorded from Express Yourself Weekly Talk Show FM 92.1 Monday, April 20, 2009 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. The special guest was Attorney Mark Bibbs from Wilson who is in the 7th Judicial District.

Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II also called in and briefed the listening audience about a meeting that took place today with Governor Perdue that was already in place before District Attorney Howard S. Boney, Jr. announced his retirement.

District Attorney Appointment/Election Numbers

Population Total – Not necessarily registered voters

Wilson       76,754

Nash          92,949

Edge          52,647

Black Population

Wilson      30,241         Wilson      39.4%

Nash         34,577         Nash          37.2%

Edge         29, 956         Edge           56.9%

Total        42%

Registered Voters

Edgecombe

Dem.      28,338           Rep.   5,645                  Black 21,980   75%

Nash

Dem.     36,319            Rep. 20,411                  Black 23,220   63%

Wilson

Dem.     30,893           Rep.  13,736                  Black 21,050   68%

Total  Registered

Dem. 95,582                Rep.  39,792               Unaffiliated 19,133    62.8%

Unaffiliated Voters can vote in a Democratic Primary so therefore the total Democratic Vote could be 62%

This registered voter data can be found at the Edgecombe, Nash and Wilson Counties and the NC State Board of Elections Offices.

Make up of the D.A. Office

1 Black Assist. D.A.

1 Staff

Contact Governor Perdue’s Office to voice your opinion about the appointment

919.733.5811 Eddie Speas Governor Perdue’s Lead Council (Atty.)

See related:

Edgecombe County – District Attorney Appointment At A Glance

Raleigh NC – Senator Vernon Malone’s Funeral Set For Thursday

The funeral for a North Carolina state senator has been scheduled for his church in Raleigh.

Sen. Vernon Malone, a four-term Democrat, died Saturday at his home at age 77. A family spokesman said Malone’s funeral will be noon Thursday at Martin Street Baptist Church. He will be buried later in the day at a Raleigh cemetery. (WRAL TV 5)

Washington DC – Butterfield Urges Perdue to Consider Appointing Black DA

U.S. House of Representative Seal

U.S. Representative G. K. Butterfield

1st District of North Carolina


For Release: Immediate
Date: April 20, 2009

Contact: Ken Willis
Phone: (202) 225-3101


Butterfield Urges Perdue to Consider Appointing Black DA

Wilson, N.C. – Congressman G. K. Butterfield has urged Gov. Bev Perdue to consider appointing an African American to replace outgoing District Attorney for Edgecombe, Nash and Wilson counties.

Howard S. Boney, the district attorney for the Seventh Judicial District, recently announced his retirement effective May 1, 2009. Boney has served as district attorney for 31 years.

Butterfield wrote to Perdue to urge her to interview and consider appointing an African American to finish Boney’s unexpired term.

The following is the text of the letter sent today by Butterfield:

Dear Governor Perdue:
It has come to my attention that Howard S. Boney, Jr., District Attorney for the Seventh Prosecutorial District, has announced his retirement.  I write to respectfully request that you interview and consider qualified African-American attorneys for appointment to this important position.

It is essential that we have racial diversity among our state’s District Attorneys.  While we have made tremendous progress in the selection of trial and appellate judges, the sad reality is that there is only one African-American District Attorney serving in the State of North Carolina.

It has also come to my attention that among the 17 Assistant District Attorneys serving the Seventh District, just one is African-American; and, of the 20 members of the support staff, just one is African-American.  This lack of diversity should be an embarrassment to the progressive reputation of our state.  It should also be noted that African-Americans comprise 42 percent of the district’s population and more than 60 percent of the voters of the political party of the vacating District Attorney.

I know you share my views on the importance of racial diversity at all levels of our judicial system.  It is important that all of our citizens have confidence in the judicial system, and that can be achieved by having qualified persons serving as judges and prosecutors who reflect the diversity of the state and district.

It is my request that you interview and consider qualified African-American attorneys for this appointment.

Thank you very much.

See related:

Edgecombe County – District Attorney Appointment At A Glance

Baltimore MD – Time to Dream Big

The struggle to end the lock ’em up and throw away the key policies that resulted in the U.S. jailing more of its citizens than any other industrialized country has just won a significant victory.

For more than 35 years, families in New York have been plagued by the notorious Rockefeller Drug Laws. The policy which included long mandatory prison sentences for first time non violent drug offenders resulted in major drug lords often going free while the non violent first offenders were given harsh sentences. The rule was particularly harsh for African Americans and women. (Wilmington Journal)